Jump to Main ContentJump to Primary Navigation
Top

Amazon's 100 books to read in a lifetime

bksfbk.jpg
bookshero3.jpg
shekf.jpg

The online bookseller has revealed its ultimate bucket list of reads, spanning classics such as Gulliver’s Travels and Little Women to modern hits including the groundbreaking economics tome Freakonomics and Julian Barnes' Sense of an Ending.

Ever wonder about the great books you've missed out on? Amazon.co.uk and Kindle has today released the top 100 works they say everyone should read in their lifetime.

“We set out to build a roadmap of a literary life that takes readers from their childhood favourites through to modern classics, and all the best books in between,” said Kindle's Ezequiel Szafir. “Over many months, the team passionately debated and defended the books we wanted on this list, now we can’t wait to hear what customers have to say about our selection.”

There are some notable absences on the list, which Amazon said it hopes "sparks discussion and debate". While the likes of Tess of the d'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy and Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice make the grade, Shakespeare doesn't get a look in. The Girl with a Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson is deemed a must-read, but J.D. Salinger's Catcher in the Rye is not bucket list-worthy.

Has Game of Thrones earned it's place on the list?

  • Oldest book: Gulliver’s Travels by Jonathan Swift (1726)
  • Newest book: The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes (2011)
  • Number written by UK authors: 65
  • Unanimously chosen: Lord of the Flies by William Golding, Trainspotting by Irvine Welsh and Bridget Jones’s Diary by Helen Fielding
  • Most controversial inclusions: Freakonomics by Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner, In Cold Blood by Truman Capote, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas by Hunter S. Thompson and Stormbreaker by Anthony Horowitz
  • The ones that nearly made it - but didn't: Catcher in the Rye by JD Salinger, On the Road by Jack Kerouac, Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel and Sophie’s World by Jostein Gaarder
  • Categories: Children's Books, Older Children and Young Adults, Approachable Classics, Something More Modern, Nineteenth Century Classics, Explore Alternative Worlds, Contemporary Fiction, Twentieth Century Classics, Nonfiction Essentials.

What do you think? Which books did Amazon get right and which works should they absolutely have included?

Related

use.jpg

New technology lets you speed read a book at 1,000 words per minute

madonna-reading-hero.jpg

Infographic shows favourite book choices of Queen Victoria, Madonna, Oprah Winfrey and more

hero-2.jpg

Hidden reading space around London: the best, most peaceful spots for you and your book

hero.jpg

Ten spectacular and easy ways to arrange your books

charhero2.jpg

100 best opening lines from children's books

More

Arundhati Roy leads Man Booker longlist, 20 years after first triumph

Expand your reading repertoire with this year's nominees

by Anna Brech
27 Jul 2017

Emoji Movie spoofs The Handmaid’s Tale – and the internet is furious

“So is that emoji being raped and forced to have babies?”

by Kayleigh Dray
26 Jul 2017

New Margaret Atwood TV series makes a big point about women and media

Netflix has released a teaser clip for Alias Grace, and we’re pretty excited

by Amy Swales
25 Jul 2017

The secret meaning behind Arya’s three little words in Game of Thrones

Her bittersweet reunion was one of the show’s most important feminist moments yet

by Kayleigh Dray
24 Jul 2017

Handmaid’s Tale fans, here’s what really happens to Janine in the book

And how she became the show’s most important supporting character

by Kayleigh Dray
24 Jul 2017

Amazon Prime snaps up seven Agatha Christie TV projects

And stars of Gossip Girl and Love Actually have signed on for the first

by Amy Swales
19 Jul 2017

Hey muggles, there are two brand-new Harry Potter books coming out

They’re set to fly onto shelves this Halloween

by Kayleigh Dray
19 Jul 2017

“How Jane Austen radically changed female desire and relationships”

Let’s talk about sex, ladies

by Kayleigh Dray
18 Jul 2017

Bank of England makes awkward Jane Austen blunder on new £10 note

Erm, guys – did you even read Pride & Prejudice?

by Kayleigh Dray
18 Jul 2017

100,000 banned texts have been built into a 'Parthenon of books’

The structure stands in the very same spot where the Nazis burned thousands of censored books

by Jasmine Andersson
14 Jul 2017