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10 life-changing apps you've never heard of


We live a life under the rule of smartphone apps and quite frankly, wouldn't have it any other way.

National Rail, Google Maps and Uber make sure we're always on time, Facebook, Twitter and WhatsApp keep us social and up-to-date and who could live without the simple-yet-ingenious torch app?

Smartphones have also sneakily changed the way we communicate with each other - yes, we're looking at you WhatsApp emojis.

Now Relay, a popular new messenger app is letting people communicate using only GIFs, which can never be a bad thing, while imoji is set to add a new layer of narcissism to the selfie by letting people turn pictures of themselves into emojis.

We've found 10 new apps to improve your life in a variety of ways - from enriching it with a daily dose of beautiful art, to saving your slaved-over recipe when you find you're one ingredient down.

1. Swackett

A weather forecast app with a difference, Swackett also provides a guide on the best type of clothing to wear for the day's conditions, from footwear to accessories such as sunglasses - or an umbrella.

Its American makers named the app after a shortened version of the “Sweather, jacket or coat?” question.

2. Calm

We naturally associate phones with the busier aspects of our lives but they can be tools of relaxation.Calm is an easy-to-use meditation app to help improve your mood and help you to sleep and relax.

Meditation practices range from two-minute to 10-minute sessions - however much time the user can squeeze in.

Just remember to set your ring tone to silent first.

3. Daily Art

This is a must - a mini art gallery on your phone.

Designed to be read in under five minutes when you fancy a small dose of culture, Daily Art focuses on a different classic masterpiece and the stories behind each one, every day.

4. Spritz

Speed-reading was a bit of a thing in the '90s and now the concept has been reinvented for the super-efficient smartphone generation.

Spritz lets readers scan text at a rate of up to a 1,000 words a minute by flashing words in the same spot, meaning you don't have to waste time moving your eyes (honestly). While it's not recommended for the likes of War and Peace, it's handy for scanning those must-read documents before an important meeting.

5. Moves

As our phone is usually somewhere about our person, it may as well be doing something useful. Moves automatically tracks your every, well, move, and relays it as a 'story' of your daily life, including counting how many steps you take each day and how many calories you burned.

The phone doesn't need to be in your hand - it works from your handbag.

6. Substitutions

You know that sinking feeling when you've planned a delicious meal, only to find you're one ingredient down? Instead of cursing Jamie Oliver's demanding recipes, you can tap Substitutions for a suggested replacement.

For example, if you've forgotten to buy buttermilk and the dish demands it, adding vinegar and lemon juice to milk works just as well.

The app also makes suggestions for vegetarian, gluten-free, or lower-fat substitutions.

7. Over

Sometimes your photos are crying out for a caption, but adding text to an image can look a little amateur. Over is the sleek, grown-up solution. It lets you easily add custom-made, visually impressive fonts to pictures for ultimate creativity.

8. AroundMe

For when you're in an unfamiliar town and want to find the nearest bank, coffee shop, cinema...the list goes on. AroundMe is the so-simple-it-hurts app that lists the local amenities you desire and points you in the right direction.

9. SwiftKey

iPhone users this app is a revelation. Promise. Remember when phones started using predictive text? SwiftKey is just as game-changing in that it seems to magically predict your next word when you're typing messages. It's already installed on some Android phones and as well as being scarily intuitive, it's a huge time-saver.

10. MyCloudtag

This new app is basically a free personal trainer on your phone. MyCloudtag helps with four main categories - weight loss, general fitness, high intensity and well-being - with individually tailored fitness goals for each user.

It was created by the Antarctica Exploration Team and the developers of XboxKinect so it's informed and user-friendly - and even lets you check your emails mid-workout.

Tell us the apps you couldn't live without below or on Twitter



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