30 Old Words We Wish Were Still In Use - Life - Stylist Magazine

Forgotten English

30 words we wish were still in use

Vanishing vocab from days of old

In this Twitter-happy world of instant slang and text speak, it's easy to forget that some of the best words in the English language belong to a bygone age. Phrases like woofits (a hangover) and callipygian (having a nice bottom) are deliciously satisfying and entertaining - yet completely unrecognisable in the context of today.

After our list of 11 wonderful words of old proved so popular, we turned to author Jeffrey Kacirk - who has devoted himself to unearthing of unusual words from years past, as presented in his calendar series and on his website, Forgotten English - to bring you our selection of our favourite vanishing vocab from the 2011 calendar, which can be viewed in the gallery below.

Click an image to launch the gallery. Also, don't be a loitersacke, and do try to make us chuckle like a giglet by sharing the chatillionte sentences you form using these wonderful words with us on Twitter.

Picture credits: Rex Features

  • Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Scurryfunge A hasty tidying of the house between… More details

    Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Scurryfunge

    A hasty tidying of the house between the time you see a neighbour and the time she knocks on the door

  • Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Woofits The unpleasant aftereffects of… More details

    Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Woofits

    The unpleasant aftereffects of overindulgence, especially drinking

  • Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Giglet A merry light-hearted, playful, romping… More details

    Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Giglet

    A merry light-hearted, playful, romping girl

  • Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Condiddle To convey away secretly More details

    Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Condiddle

    To convey away secretly

  • Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Roger To bull, or lie with a woman; from the name… More details

    Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Roger

    To bull, or lie with a woman; from the name of Roger being frequently given to a bull

  • Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Shinnicked Benumbed, paralysed with cold More details

    Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Shinnicked

    Benumbed, paralysed with cold

  • Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Purfled Short-winded, especially in consequence… More details

    Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Purfled

    Short-winded, especially in consequence of being too lusty

  • Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Batten To fatten, or grow fat More details

    Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Batten

    To fatten, or grow fat

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    Forgotten English

    Primpit Stiffly or formally dressed More details

    Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Primpit

    Stiffly or formally dressed

  • Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Callipygian Of, pertaining to, or having… More details

    Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Callipygian

    Of, pertaining to, or having well-shaped or finely developed buttocks

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    Forgotten English

    Loitersacke A lazy, loitering fellow More details

    Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Loitersacke

    A lazy, loitering fellow

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    Forgotten English

    Egg-wife-trot An easy jog - such a speed as… More details

    Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Egg-wife-trot

    An easy jog - such a speed as farmers' wives carry their eggs to the market

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    Forgotten English

    Nizzle To be slightly intoxicated, to be worse… More details

    Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Nizzle

    To be slightly intoxicated, to be worse for liquor; to be unsteady

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    Forgotten English

    Jangle Gossiping, idle talking; to jangle one's… More details

    Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Jangle

    Gossiping, idle talking; to jangle one's time away

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    Forgotten English

    Sport ivory To smile; if [someone] smiled, he… More details

    Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Sport ivory

    To smile; if [someone] smiled, he sported ivory

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    Forgotten English

    Panshard A passion, a rage. In a panshard, in a… More details

    Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Panshard

    A passion, a rage. In a panshard, in a rage, out of temper

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    Forgotten English

    Puckfyst Thirsty. The puckfyst is a dried… More details

    Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Puckfyst

    Thirsty. The puckfyst is a dried toadstall. Hence, "I feels puckfyst" means I feel as dry as a dried toadstall

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    Forgotten English

    Wagpastie A term of contempt; a rogue More details

    Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Wagpastie

    A term of contempt; a rogue

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    Forgotten English

    Bezonter An expletive, denoting surprise.… More details

    Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Bezonter

    An expletive, denoting surprise. "Bezonter me! but aw'm fair gormed"

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    Forgotten English

    Chatillionte Delightful, amusing. [From] French… More details

    Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Chatillionte

    Delightful, amusing. [From] French chatouiller, to tickle, to provoke with delight

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    Forgotten English

    Chuffy Haughty, proud, puffed up More details

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    Forgotten English

    Chuffy

    Haughty, proud, puffed up

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    Forgotten English

    Bouffage A satisfying meal; adopted from Old… More details

    Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Bouffage

    A satisfying meal; adopted from Old French bouffage

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    Forgotten English

    Hochle To tumble lewdly with women in open day More details

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    Forgotten English

    Hochle

    To tumble lewdly with women in open day

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    Forgotten English

    Wolf's head An outlaw, meaning a person who might… More details

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    Forgotten English

    Wolf's head

    An outlaw, meaning a person who might be killed with impugnity, like a wolf

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    Forgotten English

    Doggo In hiding; desire to be left alone; lying… More details

    Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Doggo

    In hiding; desire to be left alone; lying doggo

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    Forgotten English

    Quixotism Romantic or absurd notions or actions More details

    Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Quixotism

    Romantic or absurd notions or actions

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    Forgotten English

    Dormedory A sleepy, stupid person who does not… More details

    Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Dormedory

    A sleepy, stupid person who does not get on with work

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    Forgotten English

    Vinipote A wine drinker More details

    Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Vinipote

    A wine drinker

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    Forgotten English

    Toozle To pull about – especially applied to… More details

    Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Toozle

    To pull about – especially applied to any rough dalliance with a female

  • Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Munz-watcher One of those sneaks that make a… More details

    Forgotten English

    Forgotten English

    Munz-watcher

    One of those sneaks that make a practise of watching ... sweethearts on their nightly walks, and if any impropriety is witnessed, demanding hush-money to keep the matter secret

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