Jump to Main ContentJump to Primary Navigation
Top

Gin lovers, science says you all share this unusual personality trait

gin psychopath.jpg

Ah, gin.

Henry Rollins once said that it is “cold, intoxicating. Gives you a rush, makes you warm inside, makes you lose your head. Take too much, it makes you sick and shuts you down.”

Which, considering he’s speaking about one of our absolute favourite tipples, seems more than a little negative.

However, according to psychology experts, Rollins was definitely on to something.

A study conducted by researchers from Innsbruck University in Austria has found that those of us who love to sip on a gin-and-tonic are far more likely to have psychopathic tendencies than those who enjoy something sweeter.



“Bitter taste preferences are linked to malevolent personality traits,” they explained.

Hey, they don’t call it Mother’s Ruin for nothing.

To uncover this unsettling information, the researchers conducted two separate experiments on 1,000 people.

For the first, they asked 500 participants to examine a long list of food and drinks, ranking how much they liked each of them on a six-point scale.

They were then asked to complete four separate personality questionnaires, which measured their levels of aggression, Machiavellianism, emotional stability, and tendency towards ‘everyday sadism’.

This involved rating on a scale how much they agreed or disagreed with statements such as “When making fun of someone, it is especially amusing if they realise what I'm doing”, and “I enjoy tormenting people”.

Researchers then repeated the experiment with another sample of 500 people, which confirmed the results of the first.



This means that people who enjoy bitter food and drinks, such as coffee, gin-and-tonic, radishes, dark chocolate, and citrus fruits, are more likely to display tendencies of “Machiavellianism, psychopathy, narcissism, and everyday sadism”.

A fun mixture of traits, if we ever heard one.

Researchers weren’t examining why psychopaths prefer bitter foods; however, the study’s author, Christina Sagioglou, did have an explanation - in the wild, poisonous foods tend to taste bitter, which is why so many of us are naturally averse to them.

However one of the primary traits of a psychopath is a sense of fearless bravado – a sort of arrogant confidence that comes into play when bold action is requited.

“Everyday sadism is a construct related to benign Masochism - the enjoyment of painful activities - which was first described and investigated by psychologist Paul Rozin," said Sagioglou.

“To quote Paul Rozin for an explanation: ‘For the case of innately aversive foods, there may be pleasure from the fact that the body is signalling rejection, but the person knows there is no real threat’.”



If you’re a big fan of G&T, however, don’t despair: psychopathic tendencies aren’t all bad.

Oxford research psychologist Kevin Dutton has found that their bold temperaments makes psychopaths more likely to be intelligent, assertive, and cool under pressure – which naturally makes them strong leaders.

They also tend not to take things personally, nor do they beat themselves up when things go wrong, choosing instead to focus on the positives.

And, finally, they are more likely to avoid procrastination than others (that’s us out of the running, then).

Related

TipsyTriffle.jpg

Gin cocktail recipes inspired by Great British Bake Off

iStock_48397758_XLARGE.jpg

Five reasons why drinking gin can actually be good for you

JohnnySphotography 211.jpg

Batch cocktail recipes to toast the Bank Holiday with

Hendrick Gin Bus London.jpg

There is such a thing as a gin bus and it's coming to London

iStock_89488835_XXXLARGE.jpg

How to find your sweet spot for optimum creativity

iStock_27191642_MEDIUM.jpg

Drinking with your partner could be good for your relationship

gin job.jpg

Dream job alert: this company will pay you to drink gin

gin market mn.JPG

It’s official: there’s a pop-up gin market in Covent Garden

smartphone-bar.jpg

Gin bar forces customers to interact – by blocking their phone signal

Comments

More

At last - Britain's first gravy bar is coming

Finally, a proper way to enjoy chips

by Anna Pollitt
27 Mar 2017

“When are you going to get hitched?” How to tackle intrusive questions

Useful responses for the most annoying of questions

27 Mar 2017

Oh, happy day: a live Sister Act show is coming to London

Featuring a 35-piece gospel choir and full band

by Moya Crockett
27 Mar 2017

Westworld creators answer one of the big questions about Maeve

And star Thandie Newton addresses the show’s violence toward women

by Amy Swales
27 Mar 2017

Women link hands on Westminster Bridge to honour victims

Many wore blue as a symbol of hope and peace

by Anna Pollitt
27 Mar 2017

New report: endometriosis symptoms often “dismissed” by doctors

42% of women said they were “not treated with dignity and respect” by doctors

by Amy Swales
27 Mar 2017

Airline defends decision to ban girls from flight for wearing leggings

The incident was “sexist and sexualised young girls”, according to an observer.

by Moya Crockett
27 Mar 2017

Deliveroo is giving away free ice cream to make your Monday better

That's your lunch break sorted.

by Hayley Spencer
27 Mar 2017

Muslim witness of Westminster attack responds to Islamophobic trolls

A picture of the woman walking on Westminster Bridge has been shared widely

by Nicola Colyer
24 Mar 2017

Bright, beautiful and bold Easter cake inspiration

Stylish bake ideas to nick and claim as your own

by Amy Swales
24 Mar 2017