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The seven-year-old Syrian girl tweeting from Aleppo is safe

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The world first became familiar with Bana al-Abed in September, when the seven-year-old started posting on Twitter about her experiences of life in Aleppo.

“I need peace,” read the primary school student’s first tweet from the war-torn Syrian city. Over the coming months, her social media posts – written with help from her mother, Fatemah – have provided a window into the horrors of life under siege.

Earlier in December, as the situation in Aleppo worsened, al-Abed’s 320,000 followers feared that the girl and her family would be killed. However, the girl described as “our era’s Anne Frank” is among those who were evacuated from Aleppo on Monday.

Several photos show al-Abed among a group of residents being helped to leave the devastated city, the Washington Post reports.


Read more: Syrian nurse’s harrowing suicide note goes viral


The president of the Syrian American Medical Society, Ahmad Tarakji, has confirmed that NGO workers are providing aid to al-Abed and others in the countryside outside Aleppo.

Al-Abed’s Twitter account has been praised for humanising the victims of a conflict that escalated violently this month. Among those evacuated alongside her on Monday were 47 children trapped in an orphanage, according to Unicef. Some were in a critical condition due to injuries or dehydration.


Read more: JK Rowling sends books to the 7-year-old girl tweeting from Aleppo


Some 13,000 civilians have been helped to leave rebel-held east Aleppo since Thursday, the BBC reports, and the UN Security Council has adopted a resolution calling for monitoring of the mass evacuations from Aleppo.

However, Al-Abed’s mother, English teacher Fatemah, posted a series of tweets reminding her daughter’s followers that the situation for people in Aleppo and across Syria remains bleak.

Some 7,000 civilians remain trapped in Aleppo, the UK-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights reports. Beyond the constant threat of bombardment by government and internationally-backed forces, they also have to contend with freezing temperatures, no access to food or water and limited medical facilities.

To find out how you can help the residents of Aleppo as well as Syrian refugees further afield, click here.

Main photo: Twitter/AlabedBana

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