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“Blonde, fit, smokin’ hot” Hollywood producer tweets reveal outrageous sexism in scripts for female leads

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An American film producer, has set up a Twitter account to share the degrading ways in which female characters are introduced in scripts.

There’s long been complaints about endemic Hollywood sexism, from the gender pay gap following the Sony email hack, to inappropriate casting calls, but it isn’t until you see it written down in plain text that it really hits home.

On Tuesday night producer, Ros Putman, set up the Twitter account @femscriptintros, to highlight how prevalent sexism really is in the entertainment industry, and the bleak lack of meaningful roles for women in film.

With the profile caption: “These are intros for female leads in actual scripts I read. Names changed to JANE, otherwise verbatim,” Putman began tweeting the introductions of female characters he found in scripts, changing all the character names to Jane.

Each description reveals how objectifying and superficial female character descriptions really are, making observations including:

“Blonde, fit, smokin’ hot,” “As adorable as she is sexy,” and “She was model pretty once, but living an actual life has taken its toll.”

Patricia Arquette made an impassioned Oscar's speech about sexism in Hollywood

Patricia Arquette made an impassioned Oscar's speech about sexism in Hollywood

When you see all the descriptions one after the other, on Putman’s feed, it’s difficult not to feel simultaneously saddened and angered by Hollywood’s treatment of women – who appear to be fluff or fodder for the strong, central male roles.

Putman’s Twitter account, although less than a day old and with only 22 tweets, already has 34k followers.

When Twitter followers asked Putman if he could be objective and post positive female introductions as well, he said that he would be tweeting the character intro to every script he read, whether sexist or not.

It’s just another way in which sexism is prevalent in the industry- after Tuesday’s news that only 33% of all speaking roles in films in 2015 were women. 

Read just a few of Putman's tweets below:



The feminist Hollywood whistleblower you need to know about

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The fearless feminists of 2015

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Hollywood stars launch joint attack on sexism in the film industry


Hollywood is 'disgustingly sexist', says Kristen Stewart


Maggie Gyllenhaal 'too old' to play love interest of 55-year-old man


Emma Stone on the Sony hack, anxiety attacks and Andrew Garfield


Ashley Judd reveals she was sexually harassed by a film executive


Sienna Miller quits play over gender pay gap dispute


“It's shitty men are paid more for doing the same thing”



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