Jump to Main ContentJump to Primary Navigation

"Don't Let London 2012's Heroines Disappear"


Stylist’s Fair Game campaign highlighted that women receive just 5% of all sports coverage. The new secretary for culture, media and sport, Maria Miller, tells us why now is the time for that to change.

“From the moment that Lizzie Armitstead won Great Britain’s first medal, London 2012 looked set to be a fantastic event for women’s sport. And the performances just kept coming: Jess Ennis, Laura Trott, Hannah Cockcroft, Ellie Simmonds, Nicola Adams, Sarah Storey and more. London 2012 became the ‘Women’s Games’

Like most people, I spent a lot of the summer glued to the television. The British media did a fantastic job in championing the success of our female athletes, helping hugely to raise the profile of women’s sport.

But we all know this is not the norm. Women’s sport is largely a rare sight on television. It’s buried in the schedules, if it gets shown at all. For example, how many people know that the England women’s rugby union team reached the World Cup final in 2010, or that the England women’s cricket team are the current world champions?

I want to see more women and girls taking part in sport. Female stars like our Olympians and Paralympians are powerful role models, and their inspiration is vital in encouraging more women and girls to take up sport. Sustained media coverage is a key part to keeping this momentum going.

Women’s sport is buried in the TV schedules, if it gets shown at all

The huge television audiences over the summer have demonstrated that the public have a real appetite for mainstream coverage of women’s sport. When I was appointed, one of the first things I did was write to the broadcasters to ask how this momentum could be continued.

Editorial control must remain with broadcasters, but I hope that by urging them to continue to give space to women’s sport, we can capitalise on this success. If not, we risk the names of our London 2012 heroines fading into the background, losing a once- in-a-generation opportunity.

We, the viewing public, have a responsibility as well. Supply generally meets demand, so it is high time that we told the media what we want. Getting behind Stylist’s Fair Game For Women In Sport campaign is a good place to start.”



Fair Game in the news


Support Stylist's Fair Game campaign


Team GB's Olympic female medal winners



“How beauty rituals help me manage my depression”

One writer found comfort in an unexpected place

21 Oct 2016

Stress is genuinely good for you, experts reveal

Forget everything you thought you knew about stress…

by Kayleigh Dray
21 Oct 2016

Must-watch Christmas TV: tune in for Roald Dahl's Revolting Rhymes

Just in time for Christmas

by Sarah Biddlecombe
21 Oct 2016

Bake Off fans, the BBC has already found a replacement show for GBBO

And it's set to hit our televisions very soon...

by Kayleigh Dray
21 Oct 2016

Costa’s fancy new menu includes avocado toast and Prosecco

You may want to dress up for the world’s poshest Costa…

by Kayleigh Dray
21 Oct 2016

Real-life victims of revenge porn share their stories

“Within a week, everyone had seen them… I tried to kill myself shortly after”

by Kayleigh Dray
21 Oct 2016

People diagnosed with a terminal illness share powerful life lessons

“You only get one life – and we need to live it”

by Kayleigh Dray
21 Oct 2016

This gin is officially the best in Europe – and it's from the UK

Gin drinkers, take note…

by Kayleigh Dray
21 Oct 2016

Amazing tasting menus from top UK restaurants for under £50

Total steals from Michelin-starred spots

by Amy Swales
20 Oct 2016

9 hilarious tips for making it in a male-dominated workplace

"Never say anything that sounds like a question, even questions."

by Harriet Hall
20 Oct 2016