Jump to Main ContentJump to Primary Navigation

"Fairer immigration and better protection for women: why I voted Leave"

Harsimrat Kaur

Women for Britain campaigner Harsimrat Kaur explains why she voted Leave in the EU referendum, and why she believes the Brexit will benefit all of us.

To everyone who voted yesterday - thank you. Thank you for getting involved and having your voice heard. Thank you for exercising your democratic right. Thank you for listening to the cases of both sides before making a decision.

Just under 52 per cent of Britain voted for a leave vote. I was one of them. I voted leave because I believe we need a fair and global immigration system that doesn't discriminate against non-EU countries.

Because our UK laws on women's rights, worker's rights and religious rights better protect us than the EU legislation. Our laws should be supreme, but unfortunately the EU can overrule them.

We should be trading with the world, creating our own trade deals in the best interest of British businesses of all shapes and sizes

Firstly, I believe we need a global, humane and fair response to immigration. I want an open, decent, outward looking Britain, but how can we have that when we ignore most of the world? Being a part of the EU allows EU citizens to have the right to come here, not based on skills, education, or what they can contribute to society, but based on where they were born.

We should not discriminate based on where an individual was born or what colour their passport - or even their skin - is. We can have a fair immigration policy that levels the playing field for everyone. Now we have decided to leave the EU, we can join the world.



Secondly, women are consistently told that our rights are under threat if we leave the EU, and that we should be grateful for the ‘strides’ that EU law has made on our behalf. The UK has led the way from the front for women’s rights and we will continue to do so outside of the EU.

The first Equal Pay Act in Britain was pioneered by the first female Minister of State, Barbara Castle, and was signed three years before we joined the EU. The UK passed the Abortion Act, the Divorce Reform Act and made the contraceptive pill free on the NHS all before we joined the EU.

We passed the Sex Discrimination Act, the Domestic Violence Act, the Employment Protection Act, and Margaret Thatcher became the UK’s first female PM, all without any EU assistance at all.

Maternity rights and child care in this country offer far greater protections than the EU legislates for.

And perhaps most shockingly of all: the UK outlawed the abhorrent practice known as Female Genital Mutilation in 1985. Amazingly, the EU only passed legislation on this in 2012.

Britain protects women's rights better than the EU.

Now I’m not disillusioned - I realise the hard work starts now. The Government needs to find the best way for Britain to thrive outside of the European Union. A way to implement a fair and global immigration policy. A way to negotiate the best trade deals with the EU but also other countries around the world. A way to ensure Britain's influence is still heard across the globe, and to ensure we use our influence to help those who need it most.

I also realise that 48% of Britain did not want this result. That’s 16 million people who still need to be listened to.

I believe the most important thing now is for the public, whichever way one voted, to stay involved, to influence and to reform.

We need to pull together and make sure the Government, whoever that ends up being, knows what we desperately need from the exit agreements. We need to ensure the Government is thinking about all of us - small businesses and large, those in the north and the south, people who voted for this result and those that didn’t.

The beauty of democracy is that a case is laid out, and the public gets to decide. This time, the public decided to leave the European Union and to take control. Taking control starts now, with each and every one of us getting involved.




Londoners react to the #Brexit result


Stylist's Susan Riley responds to the EU exit


A tale of defeat from a Remain campaigner in Yorkshire


Lucy Mangan on feeling like a stranger in the face of a new Britain


“Let's still be friends?” Our farewell letters to the European Union


Courage, not fear: why we’ve fallen in love with Ruth Davidson


Feline campaigners have their say on the EU referendum


Why this woman used Brexit to find a date on Tinder


From Paris with love: postcards are handed out to mark EU vote



The one word you should never say to your partner

It can ruin your relationship, experts have revealed

by Kayleigh Dray
26 Oct 2016

Five orgasm myths busted and how to have better sex

Finding the fireworks

by The Stylist web team
26 Oct 2016

Ryanair are having a £2 seat sale to over 170 holiday destinations

But there’s a catch…

by Kayleigh Dray
26 Oct 2016

Quiz: Bake Off fans, which iconic GBBO star are you?

Are you a Mary Berry, Mel Giedroyc, Sue Perkins, or Paul Hollywood? Time to find out…

by Kayleigh Dray
26 Oct 2016

Police have shocking reaction to woman being groped on a plane

Police have shocking reaction to woman being groped on a plane

by Sarah Biddlecombe
26 Oct 2016

Drop everything: chocolate butter is finally here

The stuff breakfast dreams are made of

by Sarah Biddlecombe
26 Oct 2016

Cool cocktail recipes with unusual ingredients

Expert mixologist Oskar Kinberg reveals his sipping secrets

by Amy Swales
26 Oct 2016

Gin lovers, we have distressing news for you…

And there we were thinking 2016 couldn’t get any worse

by Kayleigh Dray
26 Oct 2016

The new Gilmore Girls trailer has us very worried about Lorelai

Lorelai and Rory fans, prepare for a series of bombshells…

by Kayleigh Dray
26 Oct 2016

Our kind of cauldron: darkly delicious Halloween cocktail recipes

Jacked-up Negronis and chilli-laced concoctions

by Amy Swales
25 Oct 2016