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Half of young adults in Europe live with their parents

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A new survey has found that nearly half of all young adults in Europe live with their parents.

The study, carried out by agency Eurofund, took data from 28 different countries in the EU, found that the percentage of 18-30 who were still living with their parents had risen to 48%, or 36.7 million people, by 2011, which is being attributed to the economic crisis over five years.

Over the whole of Europe the numbers are up, with figures indicating large rises in twentysomethings staying at home in countries such as Sweden, Denmark, France, Belgium and Austria. Over in Italy, nearly 79% of young adults were living with their parents.

The only countries in which this figure fell included Germany, The Netherlands and the UK, where the number fell from 30% to 26%.

One of the authors of the paper, Anna Ludwinek, said: "The situation of youth has really fundamentally changed. And it looks different from the situation of their parents and grandparents.

"It's not only the world of work that has changed but society is changing, so the transitions are becoming much more unpredictable; people are not having a job for life or live in one place for life."

"One could argue that if you are at the age of 30 and are still living with your parents and, on top of that you have your own family, it is really difficult to start an independent life."

Across both sexes too, the numbers have risen. Twenty six percent of women aged 25-29 live at home, while for men the figure was up by three points to 34%. Even among those who have a job, the overall figure rose one point to 34%.

The story behind the figures is particularly worrying as it indicates that there's a higher level of deprivation among the younger generation, who are finding it harder to get employed and therefore become independent of their parents.

Not only that 22% were found to be experiencing "serious deprivation" and were struggling to heat their home or buy new clothes. This figure rose by six percentage points since 2007.

[Via guardian.com]

(Image: Rex Features)

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