Jump to Main ContentJump to Primary Navigation
Top

Can't stand the sound of people eating? It's a genuine medical condition

misophonia-medical-condition-hate-sound-people-eating.jpg

If the sound of someone else eating loudly, breathing heavily or repeatedly clicking their pen makes you want to run screaming for the hills, you’re not alone.

You are, however, “abnormal”.

People who find such sounds completely unbearable have a genuine brain abnormality, according to new research.

The inability to cope with off-putting or irritating noises is known as misophonia. Now, scientists at Newcastle University have found that people who suffer from the condition have a difference in their frontal lobes – suggesting that it is a real medical condition.

janet leigh

"STOP - CLICKING - YOUR - PEN!": Janet Leigh in Psycho.

The study, published in the journal Current Biology, showed that misophonia sufferers’ brains go into overdrive when they hear “trigger sounds”, thanks to a difference in their “emotional control mechanism”.


Read more: Most of us prefer our pets to our siblings, says study


They also experience an intense “fight or flight” response, including sweating and an increased heart rate.

“The reaction is anger mostly, it’s not disgust, the dominating emotion is the anger,” Dr Sukhbinder Kumar from Newcastle University told BBC News. “It looks like a normal response, but then it’s going into overdrive.”

Misophonia sufferer Olana Tansley-Hancock, from Kent, told the Telegraph that she developed the disorder when she was eight years old.

“I can only describe it as feeling of wanting to punch people in the face when I hear the noise of them eating,” said the 29-year-old, adding: “Anyone who knows me will say that doesn’t sound like me.”


Read more: Got a dark sense of humour? You’re probably a genius


Medical opinion has been divided in the past as to whether misophonia was a genuine condition, and Tansley-Hancock said that her GP laughed at her when she first went to see him about her problem. However, the findings of this new study appear to confirm that misophonia is a real disorder.

“I hope this will reassure sufferers,” says Tim Griffiths, professor of Cognitive Neurology at Newcastle University and UCL.

“I was part of the sceptical community myself until we saw patients in the clinic and understood how strikingly similar the features are.”


Watch: How to deal with brain fog


This isn’t the first piece of research that has been done into the science and psychology of our reactions to certain noises.

A 2015 study by Northwestern University in the US found that the inability to ignore distracting noises is a common occurrence in creative geniuses. Of 100 participants, those who were highly creatively successful suffered “leaky sensory gating” – meaning that they had a reduced ability to filter out sensory information, such as the sound of someone chewing on food.

Images: iStock

Related

iStock-501787264.jpg

This small lifestyle tweak could help ease depression

dog-2.jpg

Your A-Z guide to a happy, healthy life in 2017

iStock-508347326.jpg

Here's why breakfast is the most important meal of the day

Comments

More

Everything you need to know about alkaline hydrolysis

It's an eco-friendly alternative to burials

by Sarah Biddlecombe
22 May 2017

How to chill a bottle of white wine in less than 3 minutes

Because who has time to wait for wine?

by Kayleigh Dray
22 May 2017

Bride’s wedding shoot with male bridesmaids goes viral

This computer engineer's bro-maids are basically awesome

by Amy Swales
22 May 2017

This is how you decide what to eat for lunch

Salad or sandwich?

by Sarah Biddlecombe
22 May 2017

How to tell if your friendship is failing - and how to fix it

These are the warning signs to look out for

by Sarah Biddlecombe
22 May 2017

This is an avocado filled with coffee because the avolatte is upon us

That's a latte. Inside an avocado, yes.

by Amy Swales
22 May 2017

Badass woman schools male co-worker over sexist promotion text

“You’d be a lot more successful as a secretary”

by Kayleigh Dray
22 May 2017

A Mamma Mia sequel is on its way – complete with the original cast

Mamma Mia, here we go again

by Moya Crockett
22 May 2017

The reason this First Dates clip is racking up millions of vies

This widower’s first date has taught us all an important lesson about grief

by Kayleigh Dray
22 May 2017

Why do people marry themselves? The rise of the sologamist wedding

Who needs The One when it's you?

by Amy Swales
19 May 2017