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Late night munchies: Duck & Waffle's midnight feast

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Some careful prep will give you an amazing post-pub dinner...

Photography: The Gaztronome

Duck & Waffle. 12am. Although you wouldn’t know it. From the glamorous couples poring over myriad oysters, crispy confit duck waffles and roast chickens to the huge, open-plan, over-heated kitchen, it could be lunchtime at the restaurant at the top of London’s Heron Tower. Or 8pm. Anything but midnight.

We’re here to prepare a midnight feast with Duck & Waffle’s dynamic head chef, Dan Doherty. It’s an experiment in 24-hour dining and I’m not leaving until I can return to Team ==Stylist== with something reviving. “We get all sorts of people, from celebrities to regulars, coming here at 4am, even 5am, for a dinner date,” says Doherty, who thinks the 24-hour lifestyle has changed people’s idea of where and when we like to eat.

Head chef Dan Doherty, fresh as a daisy at 3am

So how did our roast chicken, potato, truffles and wild mushroom ragout go down with the team? Well, I barely put it down on the table before it had all disappeared, the sound of smacking lips ringing in my ears. Soggy kebab and greasy chips at 2am Duck & Waffle is not. We could get used to this 24-hour dining malarkey…

Whole roast organic chicken, potato, truffles and wild mushroom ragout

If we were a chicken then Duck & Waffle is where we'd want to end up too

Ingredients (serves 4)

  • 1 organic chicken, stuffed (see recipe) and left to marinate for six hours
  • Handful of dried rosemary and thyme
  • 3 cloves of garlic
  • 2 handfuls of parsley
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • Splash of olive oil
  • 2 handfuls of wild porcini mushrooms
  • 2 handfuls of potatoes, boiled and sliced
  • 1 tsp of truffle
  • 2 tbsps of Lyonnaise onions, chopped (available from supermarkets)
  • 2 tbsps of chicken stock
  • Handful of chives
  • Knob of butter
  • Handful of watercress

Mr Spoon can't help photobombing one of the dishes in-the-making

Method

Step 1: Prepare the chicken for roasting by stuffing it with rosemary, thyme, garlic and a handful of parsley.

Step 2: Season it well with salt and pepper and cover it with olive oil, before leaving it to marinate for as long as possible, preferably around six hours. Then slow roast it for six hours at 65°C.

Step 3: Place two handfuls of porcini mushrooms, two handfuls of boiled potatoes, 1 tsp of truffle and two tbsps of Lyonnaise onions onto a roasting tray.

Step 4: Add salt and pepper to taste, and then add two generous tbsp of chicken stock.

Step 5: Place your chicken on top of the uncooked ragout, and then put the entire dish into the oven for 30-40 minutes at 180°C. When the chicken has browned remove it from the oven and set aside to cool.

Step 6: Pour the ragout into a large pan, add a handful of parsley, chives, and a liberal splash of olive oil. Mix through a knob of butter and place the ragout onto the stove for two minutes, stirring constantly. step 7: Finally, spoon the ragout mixture out and into an oven dish, before carving your chicken and placing it on top. Season with watercress, salt and pepper. Serve immediately.

The finished dish as it arrived in the office: it lasted about 30 seconds

Thanks to Duck & Waffle, duckandwaffle.com

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