Jump to Main ContentJump to Primary Navigation
Top

Roquefort cheese is good for you (yes, really)

rexfeatures_1916167a.jpg
rexfeatures_1916163a.jpg

Vacherin was crowned king of French fromages in our recent Cheese World Cup - but perhaps it should have been Roquefort, as new research shows it could help guard against cardiovascular diseases.

A study by Cambridge-based firm Lycotec found anti-inflammatory properties in the potent and luxurious blue cheese from south-west France.

Clinical trials indicated these factors occurred during the ripening stage of the cheese and were particularly effective in acidic environments of the body such as the lining of the stomach or the skin surface.

Inflammation has been linked to cardiovascular diseases and ageing processes such as the loss of skeletal muscle. Acidification often accompanies inflammation in conditions such as arthritis, making the anti-inflammatory agents of Roquefort in acidic environments even more relevant.

Researchers said the findings could indicate why the French enjoy good health and high life expectancy, despite a diet that is traditionally high in saturated fat.

In a paper titled Could cheese be the missing piece in the French paradox puzzle?, the team concluded that regular consumption of Roquefort and other moulded, fermented cheese such as Camembert could explain why France has the lowest rate of cardiovascular mortality in the developed world - despite the fact those cheeses contain lots of fat and salt.

"Observations indicate that consumption of red wine alone cannot explain the paradox and perhaps some other constituents of the typical French diet could be responsible for reduced cardiovascular mortality," said the researchers, in the study published in Medical Hypotheses journal.

They said the anti-inflammatory factors found in Roquefort and similar cheeses could be extracted for use in pharmaceutical or beauty products (without the mould smell).

While further research needs to be done, this study is still music to the ears of those of us who plan on indulging in a cheese fest over Christmas - as if we needed an excuse.

Pictures: Rex Features

Related

main-use.jpg

The world's most erotic food

foodhero2.jpg

Foraged Food Recipes

hero.jpg

50 ideas for Christmas dinner

Comments

Latest...

The jelly bean wine pairing guide you didn't know you needed

Take your sugar fix to the next level by Amy Lewis

20 Jun 2016

One of the world’s best red wines is available for less than £5

Stock up, quickly! by Victoria Gray

10 Jun 2016

51 ways to celebrate World Gin Day around the UK

Safaris, festivals, teas and tours to get your juniper on by Amy Swales

03 Jun 2016

10 grilled food lovers to inspire you on Instagram

Meet the firestarters by The Stylist web team

02 Jun 2016

Jackson and Levine on their ideal BBQ

The supper club maestros are the perfect hosts by Georgie Lane-Godfrey

02 Jun 2016

Grill power: female chefs share their best barbecue recipes

Dust off those tongs and pray for sunshine by Jenny Tregoning

02 Jun 2016

Low-alcohol cocktails to help you survive a day of barbecue boozing

Cocktail hours become cocktail days by The Stylist web team

02 Jun 2016

How to marinate (just about) anything

From aubergine to salmon by Georgie Lane-Godfrey

02 Jun 2016

How to BBQ like a woman

The last stronghold of inequality? It’s in your backyard. by Anna Hart

02 Jun 2016

Three cheers for cake: the clean eating backlash is here

Celebrate with our most indulgent recipes by Sarah Biddlecombe

31 May 2016