Jump to Main ContentJump to Primary Navigation
Top

Is this the saddest salt in the world?

Salt-of-sorrow_hero.jpg
Salt-of-sorrow4.jpg
Salt-of-sorrow6.jpg
Salt-of-sorrow1.jpg
Salt-of-sorrow7.jpg

From a bereavement to a messy break-up, we’ve all experienced moments of sadness when the phrase ‘crying a river’ takes on a new and significant meaning. However, as you dry your tears with a tissue, could you imagine someone putting those salty trickles to good use?

One London shop suggests it has done just that with the launch of Salt Made From Tears Of Sorrow.

According to Hoxton Street Monster Supplies, their delectable salt is “made from tears of abject sorrow [and] is collected only at moments of complete misery.” Partnered with a delicate lavender flavour, the salt of sorrow is said to be made from “the freshest human tears”, which have been gently boiled to release the salt crystals and then harvested by hand in accordance with the centuries old craft. Not only could this be the saddest salt in the world, but possibly the most misery-making job too?

However, before you go all *sad face* on us, you’ll be pleased to hear that, while the method of making the salt of sorrow is accurate, the collection of the salt is a little further from the truth.

Developed in collaboration with London architecture firm Studio Weave, the Hoxton Street Monster Supplies salt was actually made by expert salt-makers Halen Môn.

Based in North Wales, Halen Môn have been making organic-certified sea salt for more than ten years and created the Salt Made From Tears Of Sorrow (alongside Salt Made From Tears of Anger, Sneezing, Laughter and Chopping Onions) from hand-harvested Anglesey sea salt rather than actual human tears.

Despite its allegedly sorrowful beginnings, Jess Lea-Wilson from Halen Môn says the salt is happy match with a tasty Sunday roast: “The lavender makes a good alternative to rosemary so this salt is good with lamb and roast potatoes. It’s best added in at the end as the salt keeps its flavour.”

And what about using human tears to make salt – tell us it’s possible?

“The average human secretes a tiny, tiny pinch of salt through their tears,” explains Lea-Wilson. “As for collecting them, eye doctors use specially designed paper for some tests, but collecting them for salt-harvesting may be more of a challenge! Perhaps a tiny pipette?!”

The idea of a tiny pipette to collect tears is reason enough for us to quit blubbering and just smile.

Buy Salt Made From Tears Of Sorrow (£7) online at www.monstersupplies.org. A percentage of sales goes towards the Ministry of Stories, which aims to inspire a nation of storytellers, through a writing centre offering free writing and mentoring workshops for young people aged 8-18 in Hoxton, east London.

Image credit (additional images): Rex

What do you think? Would you buy salt made from actual human tears? Tell us your thoughts on Twitter or in the comments section below.

Related

615x330_salted-caramel.jpg

Salty-sweet is hot new food trend

caramel-sauce.jpg

Nigella's salted caramel recipes

hero.jpg

London's best ever street food

Comments

More

Samantha Baines: “It’s time to leave our vaginas the hell alone”

The Call the Midwife star has her say on vaginal beauty treatments

by Kayleigh Dray
26 May 2017

Ramadan: The best places to break your fast in London

These London restaurants provide late night openings and special iftar menus

26 May 2017

10-year-old survivor’s letter to Ariana Grande is beyond beautiful

“I really hope you’re not too scared”

by Kayleigh Dray
26 May 2017

It’s official: this easy email hack is guaranteed to boost read rates

Make your emails stand out in your recipient's inbox with one simple trick

by Jasmine Andersson
26 May 2017

Fathers pay more attention to daughters than sons, new study shows

Dads are also "more emotionally engaged" with girls

by Anna Brech
26 May 2017

Men are totally devastated by this women-only Wonder Woman screening

Who knew they were such big fans of Diana Prince?

by Moya Crockett
26 May 2017

Dog breaks into studio to help reporter read the news

The internet is obsessed with this live news blooper (and for good reason)

by Kayleigh Dray
26 May 2017

“Get over yourself”: gymnast hits back at stranger who judged her arms

Alexandra Raisman responds to “rude and uncomfortable” incident

by Anna Brech
26 May 2017

Fighting for their rights: the heroic teens battling period taboos

"I wasn’t allowed to comb my hair, look in the mirror, attend school, read and write."

by Sarah Biddlecombe
25 May 2017

Twitter responds to terror threat level the only way it knows how

#BritishThreatLevels showcases the self-deprecating humour we Brits seem to love

by Amy Swales
25 May 2017