Jump to Main ContentJump to Primary Navigation
Top

Scrabble adds some dench new words to its approved list

SCRABBLE.jpg

Does your bezzy have lolz when you obvs try to put a ridic word down on the Scrabble board? Well, thanx to the Collins Official Scrabble Words dictionary, you’ll be the one twerking in celebration when you rack up a load of points.

The dictionary has today added 6,500 new words to the popular board game’s lexicon, in the first update since 2011. These will be added to the existent 250,000 words on the official approval list.  

The new words reflect changes in language used in modern society – from slang terms (including ‘ridic’, ‘tuneage’, ‘lolz’ and ‘cakehole’), social media-inspired words (such as ‘hashtag’, ‘sexting’ and ‘facetime’) and words used with increasing frequency in our culture (‘devo’, in reference to the devolution proposals discussed during the Scottish referendum).  Additions also include “onomatopoeic interjections” such as ‘eew’ (6 points) and ‘grr’ (4 points). 

Twerking

Miley Cyrus will be 'twerking' in celebration...

Helen Newstead, head of language content at Collins, “Dictionaries have always included formal and informal English, but it used to be hard to find printed evidence of the use of slang words.”

“Now people use slang in social media posts, tweets, blogs, comments, text messages – you name it – so there’s a host of evidence for informal varieties of English that simply didn’t exist before.”

Is this cold blooded murder of the English tongue? Many language purists seem to think so, and are up in arms about the new additions.

“A lot of tournament players are not particularly happy about the new words that are being included,” Sue Bowman, membership secretary of the British Association of Scrabble Players, told The Telegraph.

Bowman, who is a former south west Scrabble champion, said the words “seem very artificial.” She sees the move as a “huge marketing ploy” by Collins publishers but added: “as a Scrabble player, some of the words are going to be very, very useful. You don’t have to like them to use them.” 

Bizzle

Lethal Bizzle thinks the news is 'dench' (excellent-11 points)

While linguistic purists might argue against the changes, those in the support camp might say that language itself is a fluid concept. Shakespeare invented over 1,700 commonly-used words by merging two together, adding prefixes and coining entirely new ones including: ‘champion’, ‘impartial’, ‘advertising’ and ‘fashionable’, to name but a few. You might look at that list in amazement, but Shakespeare invented that word, too.

Not all the additions are modern words, though. The Yiddish slang word ‘schvitz’, meaning ‘to sweat’ will now earn you a whopping 24 points, and foreign words including cinq (the French number five – worth 15 points) have also been included.

The comedian, Gyles Brandreth, who founded the National Scrabble Championship in 1971, is in supports the new words, saying:  “I think it adds to the richness,” he said. “The truth is that words from India, Africa and the Far East are enriching our language as is urban slang. I advocate learning a new word every day of your life as a way of keeping the mind supple and young. So ‘yolo’ – or ‘you only live once’.”

We think the newbs (9 points) are rather fun, and shoutout (11 points) to the Collins team for what we can only describe as an absolute game changer. 

Here's a list of some of the words we will be adding to the Scrabble board...

SLANG:

Shizzle -  American rap slang meaning 'sure'. (18 points) 

Cakehole - mouth (17 points) 

Bezzy - best friend (18 points) 

Cazh - casual (18 points)

Lolz - having a laugh (13 points)

Obvs - obviously (9 points)

Ridic - ridiculous (8 points)

Thanx - (15 points)

Twerking - type of dance involving rapid hip movement (16 points)

Tuneage - music (8 points)

Cakehole - mouth (17 points)

Newb - newbie (9 points)

Shoutout -  a mention, credit, typically made over the radio or during a live performance (11 points)

TECHNOLOGY:

Sexting - practice of sending sexually explicit text messages (15 points)

Hashtag - a word or phrase preceded by a hashmark on Twitter, used to denote the topic of a post (14 points) 

Tweep - person who uses Twitter (10 points) 

Facetime -  talking with someone via the Apple FaceTime application (15 points)

ONOMATOPOEIC INTERJECTIONS:

Eew - exclamation of disgust (6 points) 

Grr - interjection expressing anger or annoyance (4 points) 

Yeesh - interjection used to express frustration (11 points)

FOR THE BIG POINTS:

Emoji - digital icon used in electronic communication (14 points) 

Schvitz - to sweat (24 points) 

Checkbox - small clickable box on a computer screen (28 points) 

Images: Rex Features

Related

507397631.jpg

From flapdoodle to rapscallion, ten lost words of the English language

emoji.PNG

Emoji revealed as fastest growing language in UK

hero.jpg

The most popular emojis by country, from Britain to Australia

little-miss-london.jpg

Meet the hilarious 'Little Miss' characters of London

ThinkstockPhotos-179679906.jpg

Reading through your ears; we pick the best audiobooks to listen to

OUT66132745_rt.jpg

Anna Kendrick on her love of swearing, Lena Dunham and being weird

More

Why anxiety makes it harder to follow your intuition

It can have a paralysing effect on decision-making

by Anna Brech
19 Oct 2017

“Why all men must work to stamp out sexual harassment and abuse”

In wake of the Weinstein allegations, one writer argues why men need to be counted

19 Oct 2017

Drinking alcohol can help with foreign language skills, study finds

Anyone for a dash of Dutch courage?

by Anna Brech
19 Oct 2017

Muggles can attend the Harry Potter Yule Ball in the actual Great Hall

You even get your own wand!

by Megan Murray
19 Oct 2017

Walking for just 17 minutes a day has a dramatic effect on your health

Want to prolong your life? A bit of gentle exercise is better than none at all

by Anna Brech
19 Oct 2017

SATC writer admits the team argued over Carrie's unrealistic lifestyle

“I like my money where I can see it – hanging in my closet”

by Megan Murray
19 Oct 2017

WhatConsentMeansToMe hashtag sparks vital conversation on Twitter

“No matter what I wear, no matter what you think – no means no”

by Anna Brech
19 Oct 2017

The Netflix shows you’re most likely to devour in 24 hours

You, my friend, are a ‘binge racer’

by Nicola Colyer
18 Oct 2017

There’s a psychological reason you’re in love with Starbucks’ red cups

It’s not just because Christmas is coming

by Gemma Crisp
18 Oct 2017

Have a wonderfully macabre Christmas with this anti-advent calendar

Bah humbug

by Megan Murray
18 Oct 2017