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#TheySaid: Women of Twitter recall the first time they were body-shamed

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“Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me.”

It’s the age-old adage we’re taught as children, and the sentiment is clear: we should ignore name-calling and teasing, because it’s meaningless in the long run. Physical violence is far more damaging, after all… except that, now we’re all grown up, we know that just isn’t true.

Words are powerful. They can lift us up and inspire us to do incredible things, but they can also knock us down. And taunts about appearance are toxic: they stick with us for an incredibly long time, ringing in our ears whenever we look in the mirror, reminding us that, once upon a time, someone really thought it was appropriate to judge our worth by the sack of skin and guts we walk around in.

It’s no wonder that so many women remember the very first time they were body-shamed – as demonstrated by a hashtag sweeping Twitter.


Read more: These shocking 21st century adverts are a grim reminder that sexism is alive and well


Sally Bergesen, the founder and CEO of athletic wear company Oiselle, recently took to social media to share her own first time.

“‘Keep eating like that and you’re going to be a butterball,’” she tweeted. “[That was] my Dad when I was 12.”

Bergesen then asked her followers to share their own personal stories of being body-shamed with the hashtag #TheySaid, prompting an onslaught of messages from thousands of women.

Some had been shamed for being “too big”:

 

Others were criticised for being “too skinny”:

 

 

Some were made to feel uncomfortable about their chest size:

 

 

And others were bullied over their stature:

 

 

And there were countless other stories, all heart-breakingly relatable, all absolutely infuriating, and all sadly reminding us that the cruellest body-shaming comments all too often come from those we love the most.

Because, while bullies can get to us, a thoughtless remark uttered by a beloved family member or friend will stay with us forever. These are the people we love and trust with our hearts – and, when they get careless, they can do irreparable damage to our self-esteem.

 

Bergesen followed up her initial tweet by suggesting that those affected by the #TheySaid thread think of ways to respond to body shaming comments.

 

 

“What replies can we arm our girls with?” she asked the internet at large. “I’ll start: ‘Actually, all bodies are different and I’m just right for me.”

Alternatively, for those looking for a less polite response, Bergesen suggested: “‘Thanks for objectifying me, asshole.’”

And her fellow social media users have come up trumps with badass replies of their own, too.

 

 

But, whether we’re armed with an arsenal of salty replies or not, the #TheySaid hashtag is yet another reminder that we need to change the conversation about women and their bodies.

As one social media user points out, “we are each perfectly meant for our own miraculous body”, and we need to stop letting others determine our worth by our appearance.

After all, there’s only one opinion that matters when it comes to what a woman looks like, and that’s the opinion of the woman herself.

Images: iStock

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