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Video of Iranian woman bravely dancing on Tehran metro in protest against strict laws goes viral


A video of a woman bravely dancing to Little Mix's 'Salute' in defiance of Iran's strict laws on a train in the capital Tehran has gone viral, with over 12,000 shares on Facebook and 900,000 views.

The footage shared by popular protest group My Stealthy Freedom - a Facebook page dedicated to sharing images of women who openly flout Iran's laws which require females from the age of seven to wear a hijab (headscarf) in public at all times - sees the unidentified woman energetically dancing to lyrics such as: "Ladies all across the world listen up, we're looking for recruits" and "If you're with me, let me see your hands, stand up and salute" sang by British girl band Little Mix.

While she moves up and down the carriage, some passengers hold the speaker and camera for the youngster, while others ignore her.

One onlooker in the carriage is heard saying, critically: "Now this is a new fashion."

Dancing in public in Iran is strictly prohibited. Earlier this year, a group of youngsters were arrested and forced to apologise on national television after filming themselves dancing to Pharrell Williams's song Happy. The Independent reports the group of six faced 91 lashes and are sentenced to six months in jail.

However, the video of the dancing girl has so far received a positive reaction online with over  700,000 likes on Facebook.

Iran woman dancing

Masih Alinejad, the woman behind The Stealthy Freedoms movement - who left Iran to pursue her studies in the UK in 2009 and now lives in the US - said the dancing video is symbolic of a wider cultural movement stirring among young people in Iran who are resisting the Government’s laws on clothing and behaviour, in what she described as a “lifestyle war”.  

She said that she could not provide any information about the woman featured in the video over fears for her safety. 

“I was scared to publish this video at first. I waited for a while and then I saw it online on another personal page and I saw that it was public. Then I published it because the face was not shown and because the girl was trying to keep her scarf on.”

She added: “On Iranian TV it’s all women in black, but on social media, its women without head scarves and wearing colourful clothing, dancing and singing. The Iranian Government wants to showcase an image of an Islamic republic country – they don’t want to show people coming to the streets and singing.”

Watch the powerful video below.




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