Jump to Main ContentJump to Primary Navigation
Top

Police investigate wolf-whistling for the first time after woman filed complaint on builders

ThinkstockPhotos-465245187.jpg

We've all experienced the embarrassing, humiliating and generally awful moment the sound of a wolf-whistle comes from the side of the road. Our general response is to ignore it and start walking faster.

But a 23-year-old is making headlines this week after filing an official complaint to the police after being continuously wolf-whistled at by a group of builders whilst walking to work in Worcester. 

Poppy Smart (photo posed by model) said she felt upset and humiliated by “disrespectful comments” from builders she endured every morning for a month. 

She said that on one occasion, a builder stepped out into her path and said “'morning love” before laughing.

The woman, who works as a digital marketing coordinator, said her experience "got so bad" that she considered changing her route to work, but she asked herself 'why should I do that?'. 

One morning she secretly filmed them whistling and handed the footage to the police, explaining that such taunts were “the tip of the iceberg” and indicative of a much wider problem.

"People say it is only wolf-whistling but women shouldn't have to deal with it,” she told The Telegraph. "I think more women should speak out about this behaviour – maybe it will make people think twice.”

WOman walking

West Mercia Police questioned the construction firm on suspicion of sexual harassment and CCTV of the building site was studied to identify the culprits who were given official warnings by their employers.

It is believed to be the first time police have ever investigated wolf whistling as a potential crime.

The company also contacted Smart to make an official apology, which led her to drop the charges.

Smart hopes her story will prompt others to speak out. “Personally I don't think that such comments, even if they are considered complimentary by the perpetrators, are appropriate,” she said.

"Imagine hearing someone speaking that way to your sister, mother, wife or daughter."

 

 

Comments

More

New social platform wants to make sure nobody’s lonely this Christmas

“It’s like Tinder, but for Christmas”

by Amy Lewis
07 Dec 2016

How to buy bubbles: 8 incredible Champagnes under £30

Fantastic fizz

by Amy Swales
07 Dec 2016

Holiday hack gets you 18 days off work in a row, using just 9 days

And for our next trick we’ll turn 9 days of annual leave into 18…

by Kayleigh Dray
07 Dec 2016

Say hello to London’s first ever vegan fried chicken shop

Sounds impossible, is actually genius.

by Amy Lewis
07 Dec 2016

Revealed: the 25 best companies to work for in 2017

Time to brush up on your CV?

by Sarah Biddlecombe
07 Dec 2016

13 white wines that aren't Chardonnay, Pinot Grigio or Sauvignon Blanc

Sick of the usual suspects?

by Victoria Gray
07 Dec 2016

You need to watch this unlikely Christmas advert hit

We’re not crying, we just have something in our eye…

by Kayleigh Dray
07 Dec 2016

Your new £5 note might be worth £50,000 if it has this secret doodle

There are four notes in circulation with a tiny hidden addition

by Amy Swales
07 Dec 2016

Son shares mum's struggle to sell crafts: Twitter comes to the rescue

This may restore (some of) your faith in 2016.

by Amy Lewis
06 Dec 2016

The Great Christmas Bake Off: The eight contestants making a comeback

The Great Christmas Bake Off is reuniting all our old faves…

by Kayleigh Dray
06 Dec 2016