Jump to Main ContentJump to Primary Navigation
Top

Women stage protest after man slams commuter for doing her makeup on the tube

iStock-515671600.jpg

This is a man’s world, as Donald Trump well and truly proved with his shock victory against the far more qualified Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential election. But, as the song famously reminds us, it wouldn’t be nothing without a woman or a girl.

And, when all of these women stand together, the world becomes a truly magnificent place – the kind of society that Beyoncé dreamed of when she penned the lyrics to her feminist anthem, Run the World (Girls).

Take, for instance, the genius silent protest that took place on the London Underground a few days ago.


Read more: The passive aggressive guide to surviving a hellish commute


It was New Year’s Eve, and the majority of us were preparing to embrace a brighter, better, and fairer 2017 with open arms.

However one man clearly didn’t share our dreams for the future, as he boarded a tube carriage and almost immediately decided to wage war on womankind.

Social media user Rosamundi brought his behaviour to our attention when she tweeted: “Bloke has just told the woman he’s with not to put makeup on on the Tube.”

However, much to the misogynist’s surprise, the female passengers sat alongside them were listening – and absolutely unwilling to stand for his bulls**t.

“Every other woman in the carriage is now fixing their makeup,” revealed Rosamundi.

All hail the sisterhood.


Read more: Why is applying make-up on the train so divisive?


Rosamundi went on to explain that the narrow-minded passenger had told his female companion to put away her compact, because it’s “common” and “vulgar” to apply makeup in public.

“That’s basically a declaration of war,” she added.

The original tweet has since been shared on Twitter 1,400 times – and received over 4,300 likes.

And it has inspired countless others to come forward and share their own stories about being shamed for whipping out their lippy on the tube.

“A strange man on the bus once told me ‘putting make up on in public is very unbecoming of a lady’,” revealed one.

Another added: “I had an ex who kept having a go at me for wearing makeup including when I wasn't. A ‘dress for me, not yourself’ thing.”

Others – men included – joined the protest online, offering their own words of advice and solidarity.

“They should gang up and give him a makeover?” advised one.

“This is some serious silliness because it implies that it's OK to wear makeup as long as no one has to see you put it on,” pointed out another exasperated user.

“As an inveterate transport-make-up-er, it's defo aboutt using your stops wisely,” revealed another. “Stop = frantic mascara application!”

It all basically boils down to this; if we’re too busy to put our makeup on before we leave the house, we’re absolutely within our rights to do it on the tube.

If we want to wear makeup, we will – and if we don’t want to wear makeup, we won’t.


Read more: Can I be a feminist and still love make-up?


More importantly, if anyone dares tell us what to do, expect trouble. Big trouble.

It’s 2017, not 1836, and absolutely no one has the right to dictate our appearance. End of discussion.

 

Related

306_tablet_commuter_makeup_inline_v1.jpg

Why is applying make-up on the train so divisive?

ThinkstockPhotos-476739240.jpg

10 ways to stop your commute corrupting your mood

tokyo corp.png

Rail company urges women to stop applying make-up on trains

More

20 soothing, beautiful songs guaranteed to help you fall asleep

An expert picks the ultimate classical music playlist

by Sarah Biddlecombe
20 Oct 2017

Puppy dog eyes are a thing and your dog makes them just for you

A study says dogs change their facial expressions when humans are looking

by Amy Swales
20 Oct 2017

Here’s how to buy a house or a flat for the princely sum of £1

It's time to enter the real-estate raffle

by Megan Murray
20 Oct 2017

Oxford University under fire for shocking lack of racial diversity

One MP called the revelations an example of “social apartheid”

by Moya Crockett
20 Oct 2017

This prosecco festival is the best way to start feeling Christmassy

Bubbles, bubbles everywhere

by Susan Devaney
20 Oct 2017

Missing your 16-25 railcard? We have good news for you

Rail bosses have taken pity on cash-strapped millennials

20 Oct 2017

This man’s response to his friend’s period while hiking is everything

“I had NOTHING on me and I was wearing shorts”

by Susan Devaney
20 Oct 2017

Why anxiety makes it harder to follow your intuition

It can have a paralysing effect on decision-making

by Anna Brech
19 Oct 2017

“Why all men must work to stamp out sexual harassment and abuse”

In wake of the Weinstein allegations, one writer argues why men need to be counted

19 Oct 2017

Rage, lust, power and warmth: how it feels to experience ‘red emotions

“I grew up being told my body was terrifying and my voice was unimportant”

by The Stylist web team
19 Oct 2017