Jump to Main ContentJump to Primary Navigation
Top

Women could double their chances of having a baby in IVF breakthrough

iStock_83091147_MEDIUM.jpg

Women could soon double, or even triple, their chances of having a baby, thanks to a new scientific breakthrough.

Researchers have discovered that the ‘nobbles’ on eggs can be used to create embryos, giving hope to women who are struggling to conceive.

The ‘nobbles’, which are found on most eggs, are made up of genetic material which is left over when a cell divides. They normally disappear over time but researchers have found a way to combine them with a donor egg, from which the nucleus has been removed, to create an egg that can then be fertilised by a sperm to produce an embryo.

ivf

The breakthrough means that women with only a small number of eggs could potentially create double, or triple, the usual amount of embryos during IVF. The researchers, from the Oregon Health and Science University and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, suggested that the breakthrough could be particularly significant for older women who have fewer eggs due to their age.

"This is potentially a way to double the number of eggs we're able to get from one session of in vitro fertilization,” Dr Shoukhrat Mitalipov, senior author and director of the OHSU Center for Embryonic Cell and Gene Therapy, told The Telegraph.


Read more: Two parents aren't always better than one: why I'll never regret becoming a single mum through IVF


However, the new technique is likely to be controversial as it means that babies would be born with DNA from three parents: the mother, the father and the ‘second mother’, who contributes the donor egg.

The breakthrough comes just two months after it was reported that the world’s first baby had been born using the ‘three-parent technique’, with researchers in Mexico using mitochondrial transfer to prevent a genetic disease being passed from the parents to their baby. The procedure has been legalised in the UK although scientists are still developing the process.

baby

Despite the controversial nature of the technique, it is a step towards the preventing genetic mutations and diseases being passed from parents to their offspring in future.


Read more: Woman battles for right to use her deceased daughter's eggs to conceive a child


And the discovery that egg ‘nobbles’ can be used during IVF will help to further this prevention.

“This new technique maximizes the chances of families having a child through in vitro fertilization free of genetic mutations," Dr Mitalipov added to The Telegraph.

Related

iStock_72112581_MEDIUM.jpg

The first baby conceived in new 'three person DNA' technique is born

iStock_81022099_MEDIUM.jpg

World’s first sperm bank app lets women 'order a daddy'

amanda 3 edit.jpg

Why I chose to become a single mum through IVF

Comments

More

“A teenage girl's first concert should be a rite of passage”

“And, last night it was snatched from their innocent hands”

by Lucy Foster
23 May 2017

Manchester attack: how you can help

The ways you can support the victims, survivors and investigation

by Amy Swales
23 May 2017

The entertainment world reacts to the Manchester terror attack

Tributes have poured in from stars across the globe following the tragedy

by Joe Ellison
23 May 2017

Manchester attack: the woman who heroically protected over 50 children

Paula Robinson has been praised for her heroism on social media

by Kayleigh Dray
23 May 2017

Manchester Arena blast: at least 22 dead and more than 50 injured

Home Secretary Amber Rudd has called it a “barbaric attack, deliberately targeting some of the most vulnerable in our society”

by Kayleigh Dray
23 May 2017

Everything you need to know about alkaline hydrolysis

It's an eco-friendly alternative to burials

by Sarah Biddlecombe
22 May 2017

How to chill a bottle of white wine in less than 3 minutes

Because who has time to wait for wine?

by Kayleigh Dray
22 May 2017

Bride’s wedding shoot with male bridesmaids goes viral

This computer engineer's bro-maids are basically awesome

by Amy Swales
22 May 2017

This is how you decide what to eat for lunch

Salad or sandwich?

by Sarah Biddlecombe
22 May 2017

How to tell if your friendship is failing - and how to fix it

These are the warning signs to look out for

by Sarah Biddlecombe
22 May 2017