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'Observational study and a piece of reportage' claims creator of 'Women Who Eat On Tubes'

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If you're a fan of the internet, you'll probably be aware of the furore surrounding the Facebook group Women Who Eat On Tubes.

Last month, we discussed the site, which "celebrates" women eating while they're travelling on the London Underground, and flagged up the numerous issues we had (and still have) with it.

And today the group creator, Tony Burke, appeared on Women's Hour on Radio 4 in a bid to defend his "project".

During the discussion, which took place between Burke and student Lucy Brisbane McKay who is organising a protest against the group, there was no changing Burke's mind on how he viewed this blatant act of misogyny, which he attempted to dress up as art.

Burke described his project as being an observational study and a piece of reportage. He also said that he didn't think you should have to ask someone's permission to take a photo of them.

Although he admitted it wasn't meant to mutate into this radioactive monster it's become as he started it in 2011, for a very small group of people.

Mckay demanded why he didn't take responsibility for what the group has become. But Burke continually stood by his argument that the group was meant to be a piece of art rather than anti-women.

During the interview, Burke also claimed that the page had been taken down by Facebook.

However it turns out that's simply not the case.

A quick look this morning shows the group is still in existence, just it's now private, rather than open for all the public to see.

We contacted Facebook for a response however we were unable to get a comment on just who had shut down the group, if it was a mistake by Facebook or a member of the group's admin.

Other 'choice' quotes from Burke include his defense that the feminism angle was just one discussion, and while he empathised with it (SURE), he thought that argument was irrelevant.

As McKay quite rightly says: "Women don't want to be seen as wildlife. Especially since your art is non-consensual."

We couldn't have put it better ourselves.

Listen to the WWEOT discussion below...

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