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Brie Larson wore a low-cut top on daytime TV – and misogynists lost their s**t

brie larson.jpg

Let’s state facts; The One Show doesn’t make headlines – ever. However, after yesterday’s interview with Brie Larson, the chat show (which fills the grey schedule space just before EastEnders) became something of a talking point on social media.

Not because of all the interesting things that the self-confessed feminist had to say, however; oh no. Instead, misogynists everywhere absolutely lost the plot because – newsflash – Larson has breasts.


Read more: “Unladylike” Gigi Hadid and why women are always blamed for acts of violence


The Oscar-winning actor wore a khaki jumpsuit with a low-cut neckline as she sat down on the sofa with her Kong: Skull Island co-stars, Samuel L Jackson and Tom Hiddleston.

Unsurprisingly, daytime TV viewers (and we use the term ‘daytime’ incredibly loosely, as the show aired at 7pm) couldn’t handle it.

At all.

“Ummm, that’s quite a lot of breast for 7pm on a Wednesday,” wrote one.

Another added: “Why is it acceptable for some actress to sit on prime time TV showing her bloody chest – show your talent, not your breasts.”

Yes, they really described the standout star of The Room as “some actress”. Yes, they really called it her “bloody chest”.

And the comments grew even more incensed and ridiculous from then onwards.

Some even praised The One Show host Matt Baker for maintaining eye contact with Larson throughout the interview, suggesting it is perfectly acceptable for a professional male presenter to do away with treating women like intelligent human beings and, instead, ogle their cleavage.


Read more: Gigi Hadid attacked by stranger and immediately blamed for it


Larson did not respond to the ridiculous furore over her outfit, but, for her appearance on ITV’s Lorraine today, opted for a high-neck number.

One infamous tabloid newspaper, clearly taking this as a sign that their misogynist bullying had done the trick, ran a picture of the actor underneath the headline: “She got the memo! Brie Larson covers up in a high-neck blue lace dress on Lorraine… a day after her controversial pre-watershed busty display”.

Thankfully, amongst the rampant sexism, were a few voices of reason.

“If Brie Larson upset you, get your priorities straight,” wrote one. “You watch The One Show, for f**k’s sake. Be more concerned about your life than what Brie wears.”

Another wrote: “If a woman wants to show off her boobs, let her do it, damn it. No one has the right to shame anyone.”

“Brie Larson is Captain Marvel,” pointed out another feminist. “She can wear whatever she damn well likes.”

Hear, hear.


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It seems thoroughly ridiculous that, in this day and age, women are still measured by impossible beauty and sartorial standards.

Earlier this year, one major fashion magazine announced that “the cleavage is over”, clearly assuming that women everywhere can pluck their breasts off and tuck them away under the bed until they’re fashionable again. President Donald Trump, meanwhile, has urged female staffers to “dress like a woman” – an incredibly sexist statement that sparked outcry on Twitter.

And it doesn’t stop there; women are constantly measured in terms of cup size, dress size, weight and thigh circumference, hair colour (woe betide any woman who dares bare her greys), and makeup application (we’re slammed for applying it on the train, for applying too much, and for not applying it at all).

Brie Larson on Lorraine

Brie Larson on Lorraine

This sort of judgement and criticism is primarily reserved for women, and it will always be there. Nobody ever looks at Samuel L Jackson and remarks on his outfit – in fact, in 2014, a male TV presenter wore the same suit every day for a year to see if anybody would notice. Spoilers: they did not.

By reducing a woman’s worth down to her appearance, we slyly diminish her role and her value as a contributor to society. People care far too much about how things look, rather than looking at how things are. And it’s high time that we speak out against this rampant sexism.

After all, if a bonafide superhero can’t get through a TV interview without having her appearance shamed on social media, who can? 

Images: BBC One, ITV

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