Jump to Main ContentJump to Primary Navigation
Top

“If you don’t want to entice a rapist, don’t wear high heels” Chrissie Hynde sparks outrage with rape comments

rexfeatures_3772552i.jpg

Rock star Chrissie Hynde has provoked outrage by claiming that some rape victims are to blame for being assaulted.

In an outspoken interview with The Sunday Times to promote her new autobiography, the former Pretenders frontwoman suggested that what women wear and how they behave determines whether they are partly responsible for being attacked.

“If you’re wearing something that says ‘Come and f*** me’, you’d better be good on your feet,” she said.

In her book, she recounts being sexually assaulted by a motorbike gang in Ohio in the ‘70s, and maintains that the attack was her own fault.

At the time she was on drugs and agreed to go to a party with the gang - instead the men took her to an empty house and sexually attacked her.

“Now, let me assure you, that, technically speaking, however you want to look at it, this was all my doing and I take full responsibility.

“You can’t f*** about with people, especially people who wear ‘I Heart Rape’ and ‘On Your Knees’ badges.” - extract from Reckless

When she is challenged over her views on rape, the 63-year-old stands by her position, adding, “If I’m walking around in my underwear and I’m drunk? Who else’s fault can it be?”

Chrissie Hynde

Hynde also suggests that women can avoid being sexually assaulted by not dressing “provocatively” and by not being “lairy”.

“If you don’t want to entice a rapist, don’t wear high heels so you can’t run from him,” she said.

She has been widely criticised by equality campaigners and charities who support victims of rape. 

Lucy Hastings, the director of charity Victim Support responded to Hynde: “Victims of sexual violence should never feel or be made to feel that they were responsible for the appalling crime they suffered - regardless of circumstances or factors which may have made them particularly vulnerable.

“They should not blame themselves or be blamed for failing to prevent an attack - often they will have been targeted by predatory offenders who are responsible for their actions.

“It is critical that nothing deters victims of sexual violence from coming forward to the police or to independent organisations so they can get the help and support they need.”

Some experts pointed out that Hynde's stance was “self-blaming” behaviour typically used by some rape victims as a coping strategy.

Polly Neate, the chief executive of Women’s Aid, added: “It doesn’t matter what lifestyle you lead or what you wear - rape is never the victim’s fault. Chrissie Hynde’s experience was not her fault.”

Despite her longtime status as a feminist icon now being on shaky ground, Hynde maintains during the interview that she is the “poster girl for feminism.”

“I’ve never made a decision because a guy suggested it,” she said. "I’ve always been self-supporting. I’ve never moved somewhere because of a guy. I’m not proud of it, I just do my thing.”

What do you think of Hydne's comments? Tell us below or on Facebook

Related

hero-main.jpg

Myth and rape: will we ever stamp out victim-blaming in cases of sexual assault?

163816036.jpg

Why is society having trouble defining rape? Stylist investigates

rexfeatures_944618a.jpg

Do we need women-only train carriages?

Alison McGovern Channel 4 news.jpg

MP shares letter complaining about her ‘prominent cleavage’

rexfeatures_4849153c.jpg

Miley Cyrus calls out Robin Thicke over controversial MTV performance

152569841.jpg

Men must prove a woman said 'yes' to sex under new rape guidance

Comments

More

Lily Allen reveals she suffered from PTSD following son's stillbirth

She was attacked online trolls shortly after the admission

by Kayleigh Dray
27 Feb 2017

Watch the hilarious 2017 Oscars edition of Celebrity Mean Tweets

“Go f**k yourself, Ryan Gosling”

by Kayleigh Dray
27 Feb 2017

Emma Stone has her say on that awkward La La Land mix up

“I don’t mean to start stuff, but…”

by Kayleigh Dray
27 Feb 2017

The best non-romantic couples at the 2017 Oscars

From friends, to mums, to siblings

by Kayleigh Dray
27 Feb 2017

Why ‘The Salesman’ speech was one of the most important of the Oscars

Iranian-American Anouseh Ansari delivered a powerful critique of Trump’s travel ban on behalf of director Asghar Farhadi.

by Moya Crockett
27 Feb 2017

Jennifer Aniston tears up as she remembers lost friends at the Oscars

“All were loved, and all will be missed”

by Kayleigh Dray
27 Feb 2017

Viola Davis’ empowering speech completely stole the show at the Oscars

She’s the first black actor to win an Oscar, Emmy, and a Tony

by Kayleigh Dray
27 Feb 2017

The best behind-the-scenes Instagrams from the Oscars 2017

Pre-party pampering, post-win celebrations and obligatory bathroom selfies

by Moya Crockett
27 Feb 2017

Emma Stone uses Oscars 2017 dress to make powerful feminist statement

The Best Actress winner decided it was time to get political on the red carpet

by Kayleigh Dray
27 Feb 2017

Helen Mirren on lacking confidence and self-esteem

“I thought I looked stupid when I smiled”

by Amy Swales
24 Feb 2017