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Pharrell Williams defends ‘Blurred Lines’ lyrics ‘I was coming from a decent place’

pharrell use 2

It was the hit pop song of 2013 which triggered criticism for its misogynistic lyrics, and now Pharrell Williams has spoken out in defence of Blurred Lines.

Speaking to The Independent, the lyricist defended his hit, saying it was a woman taking control of a situation ‘I’d never want to say anything about sex. Like, ‘rape-y’ would mean, ‘I’m gonna do this to you, you know you want me to do that to you…’

The self-labelled feminist continued “You have to make sure that you’re coming from a decent place. And I was coming from a decent place. Because when you look at the song in totality you realise that the song’s about a woman who wanted to… who felt something, but decided to take it out on the dancefloor.”

What’s wrong with that? I know I want it'

Pharrell Williams Blurred Lines

The video for the controversial song contained several naked women

Of the song, which includes the lyrics “I know you want it” and 'Not many women can refuse this pimping, I'm a nice guy, but don't get confused' Pharell added, "The song was a pie-in-the-sky idea of a conversation that never took place! The song ain’t about doing it! Nothing ever happens. ‘Cause she’s a good girl. Duh!”

Earlier this year, it emerged in court documents that Pharrell was responsible for the majority of the lyrics of the song, with Robin Thicke saying he had falsely claimed most of the credit for the song. He admitted '“I was high on Vicodin and alcohol when I showed up at the studio. So my recollection is when we made the song, I thought I wanted — I  — I wanted to be more involved than I actually was by the time, nine months later, it became a huge hit and I wanted credit.”

Read the full interview with Pharrell Williams in The Independent’s Radar magazine on Saturday 18 October

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