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Sheryl Sandberg pens beautiful essay about grieving the sudden death of her husband "I have lived thirty years in these thirty days"

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Last month, Sheryl Sandberg's husband, Dave Goldberg, suddenly died in an accident while on a family holiday in Mexico.

Now the COO of Facebook has opened up about her grief, her mourning process and the best way to communicate with someone who has lost a loved one in a moving and heartfelt post on the social network.

"Today is the end of sheloshim for my beloved husband—the first thirty days," began Sandberg's letter. "A childhood friend of mine who is now a rabbi recently told me that the most powerful one-line prayer he has ever read is: “Let me not die while I am still alive.” I would have never understood that prayer before losing Dave. Now I do."

Goldberg, 47, was CEO of SurveyMonkey and died from a head injury sustained after falling off a treadmill at a private villa near Puerto Vallarta, Mexico.

"I think when tragedy occurs, it presents a choice," continued Sandberg, 45. "You can give in to the void, the emptiness that fills your heart, your lungs, constricts your ability to think or even breathe. Or you can try to find meaning. These past thirty days, I have spent many of my moments lost in that void. And I know that many future moments will be consumed by the vast emptiness as well. But when I can, I want to choose life and meaning."

The mother of two - a son, 10, and a daughter, 8 - said she penned the letter "to give back some of what others have given to me" during her mourning period.

"While the experience of grief is profoundly personal, the bravery of those who have shared their own experiences has helped pull me through...So I am sharing what I have learned in the hope that it helps someone else. In the hope that there can be some meaning from this tragedy."

Read a few of her most touching and inspiring words below.

Sheryl Sandberg

"I have gained a more profound understanding of what it is to be a mother, both through the depth of the agony I feel when my children scream and cry and from the connection my mother has to my pain. She has tried to fill the empty space in my bed, holding me each night until I cry myself to sleep. She has fought to hold back her own tears to make room for mine. She has explained to me that the anguish I am feeling is both my own and my children’s, and I understood that she was right as I saw the pain in her own eyes."

"Real empathy is sometimes not insisting that it will be okay but acknowledging that it is not. When people say to me, “You and your children will find happiness again,” my heart tells me, Yes, I believe that, but I know I will never feel pure joy again. Those who have said, “You will find a new normal, but it will never be as good” comfort me more because they know and speak the truth. Even a simple “How are you?”—almost always asked with the best of intentions—is better replaced with “How are you today?” When I am asked “How are you?” I stop myself from shouting, My husband died a month ago, how do you think I am? When I hear “How are you today?” I realize the person knows that the best I can do right now is to get through each day."

"Although we now know that Dave died immediately, I didn’t know that in the ambulance. The trip to the hospital was unbearably slow. I still hate every car that did not move to the side, every person who cared more about arriving at their destination a few minutes earlier than making room for us to pass. I have noticed this while driving in many countries and cities. Let’s all move out of the way. Someone’s parent or partner or child might depend on it."

Sheryl Sandberg and Dave

"I have learned to ask for help—and I have learned how much help I need. Until now, I have been the older sister, the COO, the doer and the planner. I did not plan this, and when it happened, I was not capable of doing much of anything. Those closest to me took over. They planned. They arranged. They told me where to sit and reminded me to eat. They are still doing so much to support me and my children."

"Speaking openly replaced the fear of doing and saying the wrong thing.
"Many of my co-workers had a look of fear in their eyes as I approached. I knew why—they wanted to help but weren’t sure how. Should I mention it? Should I not mention it? If I mention it, what the hell do I say? I realized that to restore that closeness with my colleagues that has always been so important to me, I needed to let them in. And that meant being more open and vulnerable than I ever wanted to be. I told those I work with most closely that they could ask me their honest questions and I would answer. I also said it was okay for them to talk about how they felt. One colleague admitted she’d been driving by my house frequently, not sure if she should come in. Another said he was paralyzed when I was around, worried he might say the wrong thing...Once I addressed the elephant, we were able to kick him out of the room."

Sheryl Sandberg on her wedding day

"I no longer take each day for granted. When a friend told me that he hates birthdays and so he was not celebrating his, I looked at him and said through tears, “Celebrate your birthday, goddammit. You are lucky to have each one.” My next birthday will be depressing as hell, but I am determined to celebrate it in my heart more than I have ever celebrated a birthday before."

"Let’s just kick the shit out of option B"
"I was talking to one of these friends about a father-child activity that Dave is not here to do. We came up with a plan to fill in for Dave. I cried to him, “But I want Dave. I want option A.” He put his arm around me and said, “Option A is not available. So let’s just kick the shit out of option B.”

Sandberg ended her message with a toast to her husband: "Dave, to honor your memory and raise your children as they deserve to be raised, I promise to do all I can to kick the shit out of option B. And even though sheloshim has ended, I still mourn for option A. I will always mourn for option A. As Bono sang, “There is no end to grief . . . and there is no end to love.” I love you, Dave."

Read her full letter on Facebook.

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