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New supersonic jet to cut London to New York journey time to just over four hours

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A new supersonic passenger jet is set to cut the travelling time from London to New York to four hours and 20 minutes. Currently, the trip takes an average seven and a half hours. 

The plane will feature a 30-foot-long cabin and will seat up to 11 passengers in business-style comfort, and could be ready by 2022.

However, if you've got any thoughts that you'll be able to jet off and do some shopping in NYC, think again, as for now this is only going to be available to the super rich, as one plane will set you back £60 million ($100 million).

Created by Airbus, which is teaming up with US-based Aerospace firm Aerion, the supersonic jet is set to fly at 1,217mph. Currently the average plane travels at 750mph.

The machine is set to use a proprietary supersonic laminar flow technology - a speed which is almost as fast as Concorde's 1,350mph.

Jet

The Aerion AS2 interior

Engineers from Airbus' Defence and Space Division will work with Aerion at its base in Nevada on the AS2 jet and test flights will begin by 2019, with a plan to get the plane certified in 2021 and the first delivery by 2022.

Design features include wings which reduce overall drag by 20 per cent, allowing for lower fuel consumption and longer range and a luxurious 30-foot-long cabin will seat up to 12 passengers.

Jet

The Aerion AS2 exterior

But it's not just the transatlantic trip that's going to get shorter. The flight between New York and LA is also set to be reduced with another new supersonic jet designed by US aerospace company Lockheed Martin.  

At the moment, the trip takes roughly five hours but the newly designed N+2 airplane is thought to be able to travel twice as fast which means you can get to the West Coast in 2.5 hours. 

N+2 airplane

N+2 airplane exterior

The jet will be able to carry 80 passengers and have a tri-jet configuration which means that one engine is on top of the aircraft and the other two are under each wing, in a bid to reduce sonic boom. 

While currently the flights aren't available for the masses, the changes in technology may well mean we all get the chance to experience it too. 

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