Beauty

Lush launches its first-ever packaging free shop

Posted by
Hanna Ibraheem
Published

Ethical beauty brand Lush is encouraging its customers to shop as waste-free as possible.

We’ve seen significant steps taken in the war against plastic. Earlier this year, the UK government banned the use of microbeads within all beauty and personal use plastic, and Theresa May later announced a proposal to ban the sale of plastic straws and cotton buds.

Perhaps most significantly, last month saw the introduction of the UK Plastics Pact. The initiative involved 40 UK companies signing a pledge to make sure 100% of their plastic packaging is reusable, recyclable or compostable by 2025. So, it’s no surprise that major beauty brands are also announcing plans to help reduce packaging waste.

Lush has promoted an ethical approach to its products since its inception 23 years ago. In honour of its commitment to protecting the world, the brand has now opened its first-ever ‘Naked’ shop: a unit filled with products that are all packaging-free.

Sadly, the store is in Milan, Italy (excuse for a trip?) and there won’t be a Naked store in the UK any time soon.

A Lush spokesperson said: “The Naked shop in Milan is a new experiment for the brand and over the next few months we will be asking customers for feedback, on social media, at our events and on the shop floor.”

Lush’s new ‘Naked’ shop in Milan, Italy

Alongside this, the bath brand is launching a new Jelly Bomb (available globally from 18 June) to promote safety for sea turtles. When you drop a Turtle Jelly Bomb in the tub, agar agar seaweed strands emerge and float on the top of the water to remind you about the threat these animals face in the ocean.

£4.95 each, available globally from 18 June

However, if you’re keen to begin an environmentally-friendly bathroom ASAP, you can start now. Decades ago, Lush created the first-ever shampoo bar, which saves nearly 6 million plastic bottles yearly. Additionally, the brand now offers a solid alternative to liquid shower gel (£9.95, uk.lush.com).

Product inventor and co-founder Mark Constantine said: “I began unintentionally making naked products and I’ve gone down that route ever since. My first invention was the shampoo bar in the late Eighties. Since then we’ve taken the concept much further.”

Keep an eye out for next week’s issue of Stylist, which includes a special report on plastic and how you can reduce your usage hitting the streets and online on 13 June.

All images: Lush