Beauty

PFW: Clear make-up is the hottest new beauty look thanks to John Galliano

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Amerley Ollennu
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Colourless make-up meant skin took centre stage at John Galliano’s Paris Fashion Week show

No make-up-make-up is how artists describe a look where skin in devoid of redness, yet not caked in concealer, foundation or powder. Where cheekbones are chiselled and brows are groomed by way of hairs being subtly drawn on one by one to shape and fill, all while looking completely natural. 

But at John Galliano a/w 2018, no make-up actually meant no pigmented make-up was used at all. In fact, just four clear products in total made up the look and the idea of naked skin came straight from Galliano himself.

The accessories – pearl necklaces wrapped around the neck and hair as well as drop pearl earrings – “were immense,” says lead make-up artist Christelle Cocquet. “So [Galliano] wanted the models to be nude and bare.”

“I first created a minimal make-up look that we trialled pre-show,’ she adds. “Skin was raw and fresh. I used a light veil of base, a touch of shine on the eye and a subtle highlight on the cheekbone, but this was still too much, so we striped it back to next to nothing.” 

Without the option of pigmented make-up, artists backstage applied clear, illuminating and glossy products to achieve the fresh take on no make-up make-up. 

They began with Mac Face & Body Mixing Medium, £16.50, which is the base of its Studio Face And Body Foundation, £30, sans colour. Instead, it simply imparts a pearlescent veil, which instantly illuminates the skin. This product was followed by a clear gloss on the models’ eyelids and the tops of their cheeks. Lashes and brows were groomed with a colourless brow gel and the whole ‘see-through’ look was fixed in place with a setting spray.

Like the idea of luminous skin and a reflective shine but not sure you could go concealer- or foundation-free? Cocquet suggests ‘cutting’ your foundation with Mac’s Mixing Medium, as this will produce veil-like coverage rather than a detectable film of make-up. 

“I use this trick on a lot of shoots and for runway shows because it looks super natural,” she says.

Images: REX