Beauty

Tracee Ellis Ross shares her old-school remedy for rehydrating dry, over-washed hands

Posted by
Hanna Ibraheem
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Has washing your hands more frequently left your skin feeling cracked and dry? Tracee Ellis Ross has shared a clever trick to replenish skin, and it involves a pair of socks…

Tracee Ellis Ross has taken to Instagram to share her tip for rehydrating dry, cracked hands – and it’s something she used to do all the time in high school.

In a four-minute-long IGTV, Ross asks viewers how they’re doing and how their hearts are feeling before adding, “At the same time, I wanted to ask how your hands are doing because we’ve all been told to wash our hands and to practice really good hand health.”

The World Health Organization has stressed that washing hands consistently throughout the day for 20 seconds at a time can help to prevent the spread of Covid-19. However, repeated hand washing can lead to cracked and chapped skin.

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“I’ve always had dry skin – I mean, a lot of us have dry skin – and I remember when I was in high school, I would use Vaseline,” says Ross. “I would cover my hands in Vaseline and sometimes when I felt like my legs were really dry, I would take a shower and cover my body in [it] and put on some sweatpants.”

“I don’t use Vaseline anymore but I use a salve. I use Bag Balm and I also have used Egyptian Magic.” To replenish dry hands, Ross covers her hands in Bag Balm and then covers them in a pair of white socks. Laughing, she adds, “C’mon old high school tricks, come back to help us.”

Unfortunately, Bag Balm, a multipurpose and intensely moisturising skin solution, is currently sold out – however, Ross’s alternative, Egyptian Magic (a cult skin balm), is still available, and it’s a product that senior beauty writer Hanna Ibraheem swears by, too.

When it comes to slathering her hands in balm, Ross explains that she prefers to do it at the end of the night to avoid having sticky hands while she does other tasks. “Once you’ve finished your day, you’ve got those 10 minutes before you fall off to sleep.”

Or, she likes to do it when she knows she’s about to settle down and watch some TV. “You can’t do much but it’s totally worth it and it’s actually like a little gentle, loving version of self-care to replenish the moisture in your hands,” she says.

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Alongside her useful tip – which the Stylist beauty team can attest to – Ross also used the video to stress that doing these things for yourself is also an important act of safe-care. “I feel like my hands have aged 10 years in the last month, which is all worth it - I am absolutely fine with that if that’s what it means to stay safe and to keep people around me safe,” she says.

“But if this is also a time to practice hand health and to be safe and gentle and loving and kind with each other – which we also should always be doing – it is also a time to be as gentle, kind and loving with ourselves and I think that includes our hands.”

We couldn’t agree more.

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Main image: Getty

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Hanna Ibraheem

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