Books

Discover 8 of the world’s most Instagrammable bookstores

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Helen Booth
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From bookstores with beautiful architecture, to paperbacks sold from a narrowboat, here are some of the most impressive bookshops around the globe – as captured by the book lovers of Instagram.

Along with avocado toast, matcha lattes and shelves full of house plants, Instagram loves a beautiful bookstore.

As well as pointing us in the direction of the latest page turners, Instagram’s many devoted readers are experts in seeking out the world’s most picturesque book shops. In fact, the hashtag #bookstore has been used well over a million times, and there’s even a feed devoted to the cats that live in book shops.

Now that it’s so easy to buy books online, or even download the latest release instantly via Kindle, real life book shops have come to occupy a very special place in our hearts – they increasingly feel like magical, and unfortunately rare, places where we can go to truly celebrate our love of reading.

In the best bookstores, we might even be able to settle into an armchair for a few hours – paging through vintage discoveries we’d never find anywhere else, while surrounded by stacks of beautifully bound hardbacks and rows of newly released paperbacks.

Instagram’s most snapped book shops tick all of these boxes and more – often with the added bonus of beautiful locations, stunning architecture and carefully curated reading recommendations.

Scroll down to discover the most double-tapped book shops on Instagram… 

Books Are Magic, Brooklyn

Founded by American novelist Emma Straub, Books Are Magic is New York’s latest shrine to reading and good books. The shop only opened in May this year, but it’s already become an Instagram favourite.

The Last Bookstore, Los Angeles

This unique book shop in Los Angeles is famous for its gravity-defying book displays and trendy neon signage. One Instagrammer even described the experience of visiting as being like stepping inside a book itself.

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Word on the Water, Regent’s Canal Towpath, London

This book barge is one of London’s best canal-side delights. Books are sold from fold-down ledges on the side of the narrowboat, and from every corner inside the barge, too.

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Cafebrería El Péndulo, Polanco

This plant-filled book shop in Mexico is a green-fingered millennial’s dream. It’s flooded with light from a huge skylight, and there are plenty of armchairs to settle down in for a cosy afternoon with one of your favourite books.

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Livraria Lello, Porto

The architecture in this Portuguese bookstore is so breathtaking that it could almost distract you from the books themselves. Instagrammers love the main staircase in particular, and we can see why.

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Atlantis Books, Oia, Santorini

This charming Greek book shop has a sunlit roof terrace where you can read a good book while watching boats come and go in the bay below. If you’re lucky, you might even be joined by one of the establishment’s friendly felines.

Shakespeare & Company, Paris

This tiny bookstore is filled with interesting reads and Parisian charm. We could imagine ourselves working away on the typewriter at the desk in the window, and having a very happy afternoon.

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Libreria Acqua Alta, Venice

This fascinating book shop, located alongside one of Venice’s stunning waterways, has so many interesting corners to discover – from a staircase made entirely from books, to a ‘fire exit’ via canal.

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Main image: iStock

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Helen Booth

Helen Booth is a London-based writer, digital editor and part-time maker who loves interiors, crafts and keeping tabs on trends. She also co-founded the weekly newsletter Lunch Hour Links.

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