Books

The best new book releases of 2015

Published

2014 has been a phenomenal year for books, with fiction and non-fiction both lighting up the bestseller charts. So what will the New Year bring? 

We've had a look into our book-shaped crystal ball and can happily announce that there are dozens of wonderful books waiting to be read. With new writing from favourites like Kazuo Ishiguro, Toni Morrison and Jane Smiley as well as debut novels ready to make stars of their authors, there will be plenty to devour.

Take a look at what we're looking forward to, and get ready to add to that ever lengthy 'to-read' list.

  • Find Me by Laura van den Berg

    Famous for her short stories, this is Laura van den Berg's first novel. It depicts a pandemic of a disease similar to Alzheimer's sweeping the world, but survivor Joy must make her way to a hospital that studies those who resisted.

    (February, Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

  • The Buried Giant by Kazuo Ishiguro

    Author of the bestselling Never Let Me Go and Booker Prize winning The Remains of the Day, this is Ishiguro's first novel for more than a decade. We know little about the plot, but that it will be "sometimes savage [and] often intensely moving" and knowing Ishiguro an intense look at relationships.

    (March, Faber and Faber)

  • The Unfortunante Importance of Beauty by Amanda Filipacchi

    Bestseller Amanda Filipacchi returns with this "modern day fairy tale", an examination of beauty, with two close friends forced to admit their differences in beauty and how that affects their relationships from the opposite sides of the spectrum.

    (March, Norton)

  • The Unloved by Deborah Levy

    Deborah Levy's last novel Swimming Home featured a cast of characters on holiday, and The Unloved also explores the unfamiliarity of a travel situation as a group of tourists are gathered to help investigate a murder in a French chateau.

    (February, Hamish Hamilton)

  • A Year of Marvellous Ways by Sarah Winman

    Actress-turned-author Sarah Winman had a hit with her first novel When God Was A Rabbit and won Galaxy's New Writer of the Year award. This follow-up, set in 1947, introduces us to a 90-year-old woman who is moved by a soldier asked to fulfil a dying man's last wish.

    (June, Tinder Press)

  • Etta and Otto and Russel and James by Emma Hooper

    Telling the story of the four characters in its title, Etta And Otto And Russell And James is Emma Hooper's debut novel and has collected much pre-release praise for its charming interweaving of the story of an old married couple, their neighbour as Etta sets out to walk across Canada at the age of 82.

    (January, Fig Tree)

  • Early Warning by Jane Smiley

    Jane Smiley won the Putlizer Prize for her novel A Thousand Acres, based on Shakespeare's King Lear. She tackles a similarly Shakespearian themes in her new trilogy The Last Hundred Years about the lives, loves and strifes of a Midwestern farming family, of which Early Warning is the second novel.

    (May, Mantle)

  • The Wolf Border by Sarah Hall

    Man Booker shortlisted Sarah Hall returns with this novel about an American wolf tamer is asked to bring the grey wolf back to England by an earl, despite political outrage and public safety concerns, forcing both parties to consider what we call wild as it challenges what they believe.

    (Faber, March)

  • God Help The Child by Toni Morrison

    Legendary American author Toni Morrison returns with a new novel about the daughter of a prostitute and the secrets and lies she has been told. Not much else is known but we are told it will show "the way childhood trauma shapes and misshapes the life of the adult.”

    (April, Knopf)

  • Pour Me by AA Gill

    Sunday Times Food Critic AA Gill releases this autobiography about his drinking problem and its part in the dissolution of his marriage. It promises to be written in his signature dry, witty style, giving an insight into one of the most famous figures in journalism today.

    (July, W&N)

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