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Stylist’s bets for the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction

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The Stylist web team
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Tonight the winner of the Baileys Women’s Prize For Fiction is announced. Based on our reviews, check our odds to see which is worth a cheeky £5 bet

A Little Life

A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara

Our favourite to win. It’s not an easy book by any stretch of the imagination (it slowly teases out the brutal life of its main character Jude – and his friendships with three other men in Eighties New York). It’s been criticised for its fantastical aspects but you will never in your life read anything quite like it.

William Hill’s odds: 9/2
Stylist’s odds: Evens

The Glorious Heresies

The Glorious Heresies by Lisa McInerney

Cork is the setting for this story of dealers, gangsters and lives in an endless downward spiral. But despite the bleak outlook, McInerney seems to revel in her cynicism, giving her plot a cinematic edge which lifts it from the gutter. If only, you hope with each turn of the page, the same could happen to her characters.

William Hill’s odds: 3/1
Stylist’s odds: 3/1

Ruby

Ruby by Cynthia Bond

Like A Little Life, Ruby is a story of unthinkable abuse, this time in the all black Liberty Township. Ruby – who has been sexually abused since the age of six – tries to escape only to be sent mad by horrors both past and present. Bond, herself a victim of sex trafficking, makes the trauma bearable with a plot interwoven with magical realism.

William Hill’s odds: 9/2
Stylist’s odds: 7/1

The Improbability of Love

The Improbability Of Love by Hannah Rothschild

London’s art scene becomes a centrifuge for displaced socialites, misfits and heartbroken chef Annie McDee, who stumbles across a suspected lost artwork by the French painter Watteau. It’s also very, very funny.

William Hill’s odds: 11/2
Stylist’s odds: 5/1

The Green Road

The Green Road by Anne Enright

The Green Road has no easy resolutions as the narrative jumps from County Clare in 1980 to New York 1991 to the early 2000s across Mali and Dublin. But Enright deftly draws the lives of a messy, complicated Irish family in a way that leaves you yearning for more.

William Hill’s odds: 5/2
Stylist’s odds: 3/1

The Portable Veblen

The Portable Veblen by Elizabeth McKenzie

This quirky tale of Veblen, a woman who talks to squirrels, has divided many but we loved its unique tone, eccentric band of characters and clever way of meshing contemporary issues into a love-conquers-all narrative.

William Hill’s odds: 15/2
Stylist’s odds: 5/2

Words: Amy Adams, Francesca Brown
Thanks to William Hill (williamhill.com)

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