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What's your birth word? This tool shows you what word was added to dictionary the year you were born

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Nicola Rachel Colyer
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Forget star signs, the Oxford English Dictionary has the ultimate way to discover how your day of birth could shape your future.

Their Birthday Word Generator lists the word that first came into usage in the year you were born, shedding light on the popular culture of the time.

If you were an 80s baby, 'shopaholic', 'foodie', or 'bazillonaire' might be your birth word, whereas the 90s brought us 'emoticon', 'Dadrock' and 'Muggle'.

Containing words entered between the years 1900 to 2004, the addictive tool offers a unique insight into history, summing up a decade in just ten words.

We suspect this latest discovery will be our new favourite procrastination tool. 

dictionary

Find your birth word here:

1981 - chill pill: a (notional) pill used to calm or relax a person. 

1982 - downloadable: of data, a file, etc.: able to be downloaded.

1983 - air guitar: to mime the action of playing a guitar, esp. to a recording or performance of rock music. 

1984 - shopaholic: a compulsive shopper. 

1985 - gobsmacked: flabbergasted, astounded; speechless or incoherent with amazement.

1986 - channel surf: to change frequently between television channels, esp. using a remote-control device

1987 - bazillionaire: a person of enormous wealth. 

1988 - beatbox: to make rhythmical sounds with the voice and mouth in imitation of the rhythms of hip-hop music. 

1989 - crowd-surfing: the action of lying flat while being passed over the heads of members of the audience at a rock concert, typically after jumping into the audience from the stage. 

1990 - emoticon:  a representation of a facial expression formed by a short sequence of keyboard characters (usually to be viewed sideways) and used in electronic mail, etc., to convey the sender's feelings or intended tone.

1991 - nu skool: of or designating any of several styles of popular music which incorporate contemporary elements into an established genre (esp. hip-hop or house music); (also) designating a performer of such music. 

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Nicola Rachel Colyer

Nicola Colyer is a freelance writer and ex-corporate girl. A francophile and relapsing sugar-free graduate, she'll often be found seeking out the best places for brunch or struggling to choose between a green juice and a G&T.

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