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Prepare to get fired up
Like your social life to have a social conscience? From race to feminism, these creative shows are tackling vital issues
 
Focus on feminism

Feminist poetry night She Grrrowls is one of the best places in London to discover exciting new female voices, so head to Covent Garden tomorrow night to watch acclaimed spoken word artists Rose Condo, Desree and Kat Lyons – who tackle subjects including social justice, ageing and #MeToo – do their thing. It’s also an open mic night – so you could spot the next big thing… From £4; 7 June and 5 July; The Poetry Café, 22 Betterton Street, WC2H

 
Explore gender identities

The mainstream evolution of our understanding of gender is one of the most important cultural shifts to happen this century – and Kiss My Genders, a new exhibition at the Hayward Gallery, rejoices in that shift with joyful abandon. Featuring work by 30 international artists who engage with gender fluidity and non-binary, trans and intersex identities through their photography, painting, sculpture and more, it’s a thought-provoking and life-affirming show. From £11; 12 June-8 September; Southbank Centre, 337-338 Belvedere Rd, SE1

 
Journey through black Britain

Somerset House’s new exhibition Get Up, Stand Up Now is an unmissable trip through 50 years of black British creativity. Starting with the work of radical Trinidad-born filmmaker, artist and writer Horace Ové (a proud member of the Windrush generation and the first black British director to helm a feature film), the exhibition culminates in a celebration of black British artists working around the world today. Powerful, urgent and inspiring. From £9.50; 12 June-15 September; Strand, WC2R

 
Laugh loudly, help others

Big Mouth is a roaming comedy show with a difference: 100% of the profits from every event go to a different charity, with each line-up curated to reflect the cause. This month’s show sees a diverse line-up of female and non-binary comics – including Twayna MayneSaba Husain and sketch duo Britney – take to the stage, with all proceeds going to education charity Football Beyond Borders and LGBTQ+ youth organisation AKT. From £10; 20 June; The Book Club, 100-106 Leonard St, EC2A ● Words by Moya Crockett

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Dispatches from our mission to find London’s best restaurants, bars, food pop-ups and markets 
Momo

Regent Street is a place of paradox for most live-in Londoners; home to & Other Stories’ flagship store and some sensational Christmas lights, sure, but mostly utilised as an escape chute from the madness of Oxford Circus. And if escaping is your vibe of choice, may we suggest you take a pit stop at Momo, the shortest of hops away in Mayfair’s Heddon Street? The iconic restaurant has reopened with a new look and is entirely transporting: from the lush, plant-lined terrace that envelopes the building front and the shisha-meets-incense scent that greets you, to the decor that – with enough Sazerac under your belt – could easily be mistaken for a swanky eatery in actual Marrakesh.

The revamped menu – under the direction of head chef Hervé Deville, formerly of Sketch – is a selection box of North African cuisine with a Mediterranean sensibility. We loved the fresh and filling monkfish tagine, served with cockles, spring cabbage and freekeh, and we recommend ordering the vegetable tian (a glorious concoction of aubergine, courgette, Taggiasche olives and parmesan crumble) as a shared side between two. Really want to get a taste of something different? Order the chocolate namelaka for dessert – it’s a beetroot and dark chocolate pudding with a spicy raspberry and harissa sorbet. We’re not in London anymore. 23 - 25 Heddon St, Mayfair, W1B Kat Poole

Casa Fofó

Clapton’s Sandringham Road has had the sort of makeover that could only happen here, going from an oft-avoided street to a choice location for a fine-dining spot (from a former head chef of esteemed Hackney restaurant Pigeon, no less). It’s tasting menu only, and very experimental: think crispy beef tendon with hot sauce and pork neck with horseradish and peanut. Sometimes it misses the mark (a “sweet sushi” dessert was… just no), but at £39 for six courses, it’s well worth the adventure. 158 Sandringham Road, E8 ● George Wales

 
London Seafood Festival

The fact that the London Seafood Festival chose Batter-sea as the plaice for their marine-fuelled fun is just brill-iant (we’ll stop). Expect five days of chef collaborations, masterclasses, street food, live music and even mermaids. We’re particularly excited about the No. 29 Sustainable Seafood Supper on 12 June, featuring four courses of delicious and ethical seafood (including the intriguing-sounding G&T-infused salmon). From free to £50; 12-16 June; Battersea Power Station, Pump House Lane, SW8 Naomi Joseph

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In case you missed it
Things to see, read, hear and do before it’s too late
 

Henry VIII’s wives have long been reduced to “one word in a stupid rhyme”. But in supercharged, 80-minutes-no-interval Six, the queens – reimagined as pop divas and backed by an all-female band – reclaim their narratives with banger after banger of a tune. Sure, the plot is a little clunky in places, but you’ll laugh, cry, and scream “SLAY, QUEEN, SLAY!” long before the night is over. Could this be the historemix to topple Hamilton? From £19.50; until January 2020; Arts Theatre, 6-7 Newport Street, WC2H ● Kayleigh Dray

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Image credits: Juliana Huxtable, Untitled (Lil’ Marvel) 2015, Courtesy of the Artist and JTT, New York, © Juliana Huxtable, 2019; Horace Ové, ‘Psychedelic Sister’, 1968. Copyright of the artist
© The Stylist Group Ltd