9 under-the-radar homeware brands that’ll give you serious interior inspiration

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Fashion editor Harriet Davey has found some of the best lesser-known homeware brands worth shopping. 

I can’t tell you what led me to become obsessed with homeware, but it happened, and I’m so glad it did. Maybe it’s because I’ve lived in a houseshare (several different ones) for 12 years. Yes, 12 whole years. After having to share my plates, forks, tea towels and every other piece of homeware I’ve ever bought with other people, my joy comes from mainly looking at what I could buy, and what I will buy when I finally have my own house. If I’m not adding pins to my #interiorinspo board on Pinterest, I’m searching for vases, cushions and chairs I’ve spotted – usually in the background of outfit shots on Instagram. 

Now, Instagram has twigged onto my slight addiction and the sponsored ads on my feed are mainly from interior brands and accounts. Turns out, they know who to target and the majority of the time I end up clicking. By majority, I mean each and every single time. Help!

Good has come out of me being a sucker for targeted marketing though, as I have now found some of the best, lesser-known homeware brands that I never knew existed. I’m talking Scandi-cool minimalist accessories, rattan wonderlands and the places that have home bits that look expensive, but cost less than the mega home brands.

To make sure I can fill my future home with these treasures, I’ve made a note in my phone aptly named ‘future home’ and it contains all the sites I’ve loved and what they’re good for. Today is your lucky day, I’m sharing my house of the future with you and plan to get you as hooked as I am on all the pretty homeware. 

Your addiction starts in 3, 2, 1 (you’re welcome).

Olive & Sage

A small family-run business based in Cheshire, Olive & Sage is home to quirky furniture, lamps and accessories. I like statement home pieces that create a talking point so of course I’m a big fan of the palm tree lamp that seems to be one of their bestsellers. There’s also test tube vases, pineapple tables and vintage-looking furniture up for grabs. 

Shop here for: Maximalist, unique homeware without a hefty price tag. 

Website: oliveandsage.co.uk

Casa Gitane

If you’re a fan of minimalist Scandi-style homeware then listen up. Casa Gitane is the Amsterdam brand that made me want to buy 157 different shaped vases as soon as it popped up on my feed. They have a store in the Dam, but they also have an online shop that ships to the UK. 

They also have the coolest lamps, coffee tables and rattan chairs. Anyone that knows me will know I’m a rattan enthusiast. 

Shop here for: Minimalist, cool, clean furniture and accessories. But mainly for the vases. 

Website: casagitane.com

Sklum

Created by a bunch of friends who love art, travelling and nature – Sklum is the go-to for modern chairs that don’t cost a bomb and lighting that will (quite literally) brighten up any room. They also have the usual belly baskets for plants, gold cutlery and plate sets that look like they’re fresh out of a kiln. 

Shop here for: Modern accessories that’ll transform average rooms into ones that will get everyone asking where you’ve been home shopping.

Website: sklum.com

Spark and Bell

This one didn’t actually come up as an ad on Instagram; instead I met the lovely owner, Emer who creates all the lights from her own little workshop in Brighton. All the lighting is sold on Etsy and she recently had a collaboration with fashion designer Olivia Rubin. 

The cane wall lamp is one of my favourites (here). 

Shop here for: Sleek, stylish and affordable lighting 

Website: Search Spark and Bell at etsy.com

House of Hackney

This one may be more well know, especially if you live in East London like I do. With a shop in Shoreditch and an online store, House of Hackney is one of my all time favourites. Their exclusive prints are now iconic on everything from wallpaper and fabric, to cushions and lamp shades. Everything looks instantly luxe and will make any home look like a boutique hotel. 

Shop here for: Print perfect pieces you’ll want to show off.

Website: houseofhackney.com

Bothy Blue

This is one of my faves that always seems to pop up to remind me how great it is. Bothy Blue has the green velvet chairs that I want for my future house, different shape shelves that I didn’t know I needed and they even go as far as to group it in house styles such as ‘Scandi chic’, ‘vintage industrial’ and ‘copper club’. I’m all for easy shopping. 

Shop here for: Affordable furniture (especially velvet chairs), unusual lighting and all the cushions you could ever want. 

Website: bothyblue.com

Alaynas Home

Bamboo and rattan is having a serious moment when it comes to homeware and I’m a huge fan. From bamboo stools and side tables, to rattan headboards and trays – this is the little brand that’ll make a big impact on your house.

Shop here for: Bamboo and rattan furniture and accessories. 

Website: alaynashome.com

Visual Roars Interiors

It’s basically like one of those weird and wonderful homeware shops you stumble across. If you think you like minimalist furniture, this one could change your mind with its artwork in super-size frames, a lamp dedicated to every animal you could find at a zoo and glassware that is fit for a queen. 

Shop here for: Unusual lighting and velvet cushions in every print. 

Website: visualroarsinterior.co.uk

The Poster Club

Growing up I – along with every other child in the 90s – wanted to plaster my walls with every Smash Hits poster I could find of the Spice Girls and Take That. Now, my taste has slightly changed (although still a fan of the Spice Girls, of course) I want my walls to be a mix and match of cool prints, outlines of female bodies and maybe some nature. The poster club has the lot and you can order safe in the knowledge that they’ve been carefully curated in Copenhagen.

They ship worldwide, FYI.

Shop here for: Posters, posters and more err posters. 

Website: theposterclub.com

Other images: courtesy of brands

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