Fashion Week

Charting the supermodel evolution: Fashion muses celebrated in infographic retrospective

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Anna Pollitt
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Every few years a fashion model comes along who is a little more super than the rest.

Thousands of models carry clothes down the catwalk, but it is only a select few whose look and attitude captures the zeitgeist and transforms her from runway extra to designer's muse.

Now, 72 years on from the first ever Fashion Week, fashion illustrator Shira Barzilay has charted the evolution of the supermodel in a beautiful infographic retrospective featuring 27 Supers - from 1940s pin-up Rita Hayworth to present day Insta star Kendall Jenner.

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With catwalk models averaging between 5'7" and 5'11" tall, it's appropriate that ‘Models of the Moment’ was commissioned by retailer Long Tall Sally, which specialises in clothes for taller women.
 
Among the tallest women to feature is 1960s model, Veruschka, standing at 6ft 3 inches, while '40s clothes horse Dorian Leigh was just 5ft 5 inches.
 
The fashion industry is constantly scrutinised for its unrealistic size ideals, but while today's models are likely to have a tiny 23-inch to 25-inch waist, in the 1950s it was US model Dovima's miniscule 19-inch waist that the look to aspire to. 

British model Sophie Dahl broke the mould in 2000 when she walked the catwalk as a size 14 - an extra 5 inches on her hips than Twiggy had in the '60s.
 
Lara Curry, Creative Director of Long Tall Sally said: “True beauty comes in many shapes and forms - women whose beauty goes beyond skin deep. Models of the Moment celebrates their diversity, their strength and their uniqueness.”

Take a close-up look at each 'Model of the Moment':

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Anna Pollitt

Anna is a freelance writer and editor who’s been making her dime from online since 2007. She’s a regular at Stylist.co.uk, ITV News and Emerald Street and moonlights as a copywriter and digital content consultant. The baby is borrowed.

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