Fashion

Liberty London’s latest collaboration is here - and it’s not what you were expecting

Posted by
Chloe Gray
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Liberty is known for its unique collaborations with top designers, but now it’s branching out into the tech world for the first time. 

London has been going crazy for Liberty prints since it first flung its doors open over a century ago, producing fabrics inspired by a mix of British culture and the far East. 

Since then, Liberty has collaborated with huge designers, brands and stores from Hermès and Marc Jacobs to J Crew and Anthropologie, recreating its iconic prints on anything from fabric rolls to trainers and cushions to water bottles. 

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But for its latest collaboration, Liberty is shaking things up. To celebrate the opening of the new Microsoft flagship store on Oxford Street, just around the corner from Liberty’s HQ on Regent Street, it’s releasing a limited-edition design - with a twist.

The pattern is a nod to the heritage of both of the brands, combining archive prints from 1875, Liberty’s its opening year 1875, and floral patterns from 1975, the year that Microsoft was founded.

The Liberty X Microsoft limited edition Surface print
The Liberty X Microsoft limited edition Surface print

But it won’t be easy to get your hands on. The design isn’t available as a simple fabric, instead it will only be hand-printed on Microsoft Surface covers that will be free for the first 100 customers who buy a a Surface Pro 6 from the new store, opening 11 July. Practical and pretty - we’re here for it.

If you’re after something even more special, there will also be a number of printed Microsoft Surface devices available to buy as part of an online charity auction. The beautiful designs will be on display in store from the opening and then up for bidding on eBay, with proceeds going to SpecialEffect, a charity helping to bring fun and inclusion back into the lives of people with physical disabilities by helping them to play video games.

Tech’s never looked quite so good. 

Images: Dan Emmons / Getty