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The A to Z of spring accessories: Stylist’s edit of the items you will be coveting this spring

Posted by
Lucy Reber
Published

Updating your look is as easy as ABC this season, thanks to a whole new cast of chic accessories and smart ways to style them. Scroll through the gallery below to discover Stylist’s picks of the season.

  • A is for art-gallery inspired

    From heels that could have been sculpted on the potter’s wheel to earrings that would look at home in a gallery, surreal shapes turn simple pieces into works of art this season.

    Image: Kenzo

  • B is for boots for all seasons

    All hail spring boots – pick pastel colours and team with cropped trousers.

    Image: Alexander McQueen

  • B is for boots for all seasons

    Boots, £555, JW Anderson (selfridges.com)

  • B is for boots for all seasons

    Boots, £125, Geox (geox.com)

  • C is for circular handles

    Jewellery and bags merge with bangle-like handles making an elegant evening bag update.

    Bag, £15.99, New Look (newlook.com)

  • D is for deep-sea details

    Pearls are the spring embellishment of choice, sprinkled across trainers and elevating classic evening sandals.

    Shoes, £395, Russell & Bromley (russellandbromley.co.uk)

  • D is for deep-sea details

     Shoes, £140, KG Kurt Geiger (kurtgeiger.com)

  • E is for Eighties power waist

    The skinny belt is dead! Go all out with Eighties-esque big prints and bold buckles.

    Belt, £170, the kooples (thekooples.co.uk)

  • F is for forever boots

    The new ‘stocking’ style fit makes thigh-high boots easier than ever to wear. Made from Lycra, jersey and velvet, and appearing to go on forever, treat like tights and slip under a loose dress.

    Image: Balenciaga

  • G is for glam rock eyes

    Bejewelled frames evoking a rocker vibe were everywhere from Gucci to Kenzo.

    Sunglasses, £14, Urban Outfitters (urbanoutfitters.com)

  • H is for high noon

    Invest in Western style accessories – fringing, cowboy motifs and tooled jewels. Just add a plain white T-shirt and washed-out jeans.

    Ring, £95, Coach (coach.com)

  • H is for high noon

    Bracelet, £70, Hilfiger Collection (tommy.com)

  • I is for in the crook

    If shoulder robing was the street style hit of a few seasons ago, then carrying your bag in the crook of your arm will be 2017’s version. Plus, it’s a smart way to make last season’s bag look totally now.

    Image: Prada

  • J is for jungle fever

    Tropical charm adds interest to minimal khaki pieces – as seen at Charlotte Olympia.

     Bag, £265, Furla (furla.com)

  • J is for jungle fever

    Earrings, £78, Kate Spade New York (katespade.com)

  • K is for killer courts

    It was courts with everything at Saint Laurent and Nina Ricci, with stiletto heels and point toes adding an Eighties vibe. The perfect foil to masculine tailoring.

    Image: Stella McCartney

  • L is for logo mad

    Not just for sweatshirts, logos are now on bags, shoes and cuffs too.

    Bracelet, £125, Balenciaga (balenciaga.com)

  • M is for mini v maxi

    It’s a stand-off this season between Goliath-like sacs and the impossibly teensy compacts at Valentino – pick a side.

    Bag, £50, French connection (frenchconnection.com)

  • M is for mini v maxi

    Compact, £680, Valentino (valentino.com)

  • N is for natural selection

    A micro-trend started by independent designers, this season the human body plays muse for avant-garde jewellery.

    Earring, £70, Knobbly x Laurie Franck (knobblystudio.com)

  • N is for natural selection

    Ring, £315, Sarah & Sebastian (net-a-porter.com)

  • O is for odd couples

    The single earring trend has evolved into mismatched pairs – mix shapes, sizes and colours.

    Earrings, £25, Finery (finerylondon.com)

  • P is for pretty in pink

    Adopt the biggest colour of the season; style with black and denim to avoid looking twee.

    Image: Coach

  • P is for pretty in pink

    Loafers, £35, Schuh (schuh.co.uk)

  • Q is for quirky keychains

    From Guess’s space-themed purses to pizza slices at Anya Hindmarch, these cute keyrings are guaranteed to make you smile.

    Purse, £25, Guess (guess.com)

  • R is for ruffle mania

    Denim bag, £200, Diesel (diesel.com)

  • S is for socks & sandals

    Yes together! The trick is to stick to icy pastels like blue and silver or lilac and cream (as seen at Mary Katrantzou) to tone down a bold look.

    Shoes, £35, Asos (asos.com)

  • S is for socks & sandals

    Socks, £60, Vetements + Reebok (net-a-porter.com)

  • T is for two's company

    Bags come in pairs this summer – wear long and low in tonal colours.

    Bag, £15, Accessorize (accessorize.com)

  • T is for two's company

    Bag, £35, Topshop (Topshop.com)

  • U is for ugly shoes

    Christopher Kane gave humble Crocs a fashion lift, Teva styles walked at Versace... This season, if they’re bad, they’re good.

    Crocs, £275, Christopher Kane (christopherkane.com)

  • V is for Versailles inspired

    Brocade, embroidery, bejewelled – at Gucci it was all piled on together. Dress down with frayed jeans.

    Slippers, £55, River Island (riverisland.com)

  • V is for Versailles inspired

    Earrings, £10, Next (next.co.uk)

  • W is for white out

    White accessories are surprisingly versatile – even the most low-key editors wore white courts at the shows.

    Backpack, £89, kin (johnlewis.com)

  • X is for x-tra large

    It’s not just about big bags and high platforms, make your jewels mega too with an enormous chain pendant.

    Necklace, £342, Givenchy (Givenchy.com)

  • Y is for your mum's shoes

    Sensible heels are back, with added edge. Opt for spiky heels and point toes to elevate traditionally sober styles.

    Shoes, £29.99 Zara (zara.com)

  • Y is for your mum's shoes

    Shoes, £730, Prada (net-a-porter.com)

  • Z is for ziggy rules

    A sartorial nod to David Bowie perhaps, designers embraced stars, glitter and all things Seventies.

    Bag, £895, Aspinal of London (aspinaloflondon.com)

  • Z is for ziggy rules

    Sandals, £145, Dune Loves Rupert Sanderson (dunelondon.com)