Mental Health

Mental health: do you overshare too much? Here are 5 possible reasons why

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Leah Sinclair
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A lonely young woman is sitting alone in a room

Oversharing information can take a major toll on your mental health – and this psychologist has shared five reasons why you might be doing it without realising.

Feeling like you’ve shared something private with someone you shouldn’t have can be a stressful experience.

Whether it’s sharing a small silly tidbit about yourself or something much deeper, that feeling of regret can be all-consuming and fester inside you for hours on end – and for some, this form of oversharing can be so intense that they just can’t stop.

Oversharing is described as “revealing an inappropriate amount of detail about one’s personal life” – and Dr Kirren Schnack, a clinical psychologist from Oxford, has taken to TikTok to address the potential causes behind it.

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The expert, who has worked in psychology for over 18 years, often uses her TikTok account to address how different mental health issues affect people and in this video – which has amassed over 64,000 views – the psychologist breaks down the five reasons people overshare even when they don’t want to.

She captioned the clip: “Are you tired of oversharing? But can’t stop?”

In the video, the doctor highlights that one cause of oversharing can be linked to “unresolved trauma” and also through people’s belief that by oversharing information about themselves, they will be able to quickly develop closer relationships.

Dr Kirren says the third reason people may overshare is that they struggle with boundaries, followed by its potential links to anxiety.

“Your anxiety makes you talk uncontrollably [and] the more you share the more anxious you get but you can’t stop,” she says.

Lastly, the clinical psychologist says oversharing can also be linked to “a part of you that feels lonely and is looking for connection.”

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Many people thanked Dr Kirren for making the video, with some commenting that they relate to the reasons she mentioned.

“I did this yesterday and was so mad at myself the whole day for oversharing,” wrote one TikTok user, while another said: “I do this and feel so uneasy at times after.”

A third wrote: “I’ve overshared a lot over the years and it’s left me feeling guilty. This is the first time I’ve really seen the different reasons as to why it could be and I can relate to this so much.”

Image: Getty

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