Mental Health

This TikTok shares 4 signs that might mean it’s time to seek help for your mental health

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Leah Sinclair
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Dr Julie Smith shares her advice on the key signs it might be time to seek help in a TikTok which has gained over 110,000 views. 

Acknowledging when we need help can be a tricky thing to do. It’s so easy to go about our daily routines and muddle our way through life while barely scratching the surface of how we really feel and it’s something that is all too common.

According to the mental health charity Mind, only 1 in 8 adults with a mental health problem are currently getting any kind of treatment – and while the conversation around mental health has developed over the years, there is still a lot of work to do when it comes to acknowledging the signs to seek professional support. 

Dr Julie Smith, a clinical psychologist from Hampshire, England, is known for sharing her go-to tips for dealing with burnout, anxiety, panic attacks and more – and this time, the psychologist took to TikTok to share her signs of when to seek help for your mental health.

The video, which has amassed over 111,000 views on TikTok, sees Dr Smith outline four key signs that people should be on the lookout for.

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Firstly, she starts with acknowledging that it’s worth seeking help for your mental health when you feel like “nothing seems to help and you start to feel hopeless“.

Dr Smith also highlights that sleeping more than usual or “not at all” can be a major indicator that someone may need help.

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In the clip, Dr Smith goes on to share that significant mood changes which have “persisted for several weeks or more” can also be a sign to seek help, alongside those who feel isolated and feel like they “don’t have anyone you can talk to”.

Although many of us experience loneliness at one time or another, feeling isolated or constantly lonely could be a cause for concern. According to Mind, “feeling lonely isn’t in itself a mental health problem, but the two are strongly linked” and “having a mental health problem can increase your chance of feeling lonely”.

“Seek help any time you are concerned about your #mentalhealth,” wrote Dr Smith in the video, which gained over 10,000 likes.

Many people seemed to relate to the clip, sharing that they too had been feeling like this recently.

One wrote: “This is exactly how I have been feeling the last few weeks,” while another said: “This is literally me right now.”

Dr Smith’s video further proves that the signs that we should seek help are even more common than you or I may think. And once we are able to see that we need help, it’s important to act on it for our own wellbeing.

Visit Mind for mental health advice and support.

Images: Getty

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