Mental Health

Mental health: How to stop giving people power over you, according to a therapist

Posted by
Leah Sinclair
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From taking responsibility for your own emotions to not letting your self-worth depend on other people, these are the 6 ways you can stop giving people power over you.

There’s something extremely powerful about being in control of your own emotions and reactions.

Whether you’re being gaslighted in a relationship or experiencing microaggressions from a colleague, we go through our day-to-day sometimes experiencing things that can cause us to overthink and spiral – but being able to prevent external factors from affecting you internally is easier said than done.

British therapist Bobbi Banks has addressed this in a recent Instagram post, which explores six ways to stop giving people power over you.

In the post, which has gained over 12,000 likes, Banks breaks down specific ways to stop giving your power when these situations arise.

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Banks says a good way to do this is to begin by taking responsibility for your own emotions, followed by living according to your own set of values and limits, which can, in turn, help you to navigate situations while keeping what you believe to be true and your boundaries in place.

Next up, the therapist says another way to stop giving people power over you is by not letting your self-worth depend on other people and not allowing people’s opinions to dictate your choices.⁣

Finally, Banks rounds out the post by suggesting that expressing your emotions and speaking up when you are hurt or upset is key to not letting negative experiences or situations ruminate within you – alongside this, you should also no longer accept and excuse toxic behaviour.

Many took to the comments to share their thoughts on Banks’s post, sharing how they relate to these signs.

“Speaking up for yourself, honouring your own boundaries not allowing people to overlook you was a massive step for me,” commented one user. “And when I felt myself feeling confident enough to lay down my rules and stick to them and find my voice to speak out when needed, I knew I was doing well with my healing journey and making a big move forward.”

Another said “All of the above! I’ve found there are so many layers to all of them too, some I’m still working on.”

Learning to be in tune with yourself and not allow others to dictate your day or emotions is tricky.

But having the tools to identify when you’re potentially giving your power away is the first step to taking full ownership over it – and there’s nothing more powerful than that.

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Leah Sinclair

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