Life

Baby names inspired by feminist icons

Posted by
Kayleigh Dray
Published

The Office for National Statistics recently revealed the most popular baby names of the year so far, with Oliver and Amelia sitting at the top of the list.

However, if you're hoping to find something a little less mainstream, and a lot more empowering, we recommend looking to these badass feminist icons for your baby name inspiration...

From Virginia Woolf to Benedict Cumberbatch, vintage nicknames to modern monikers, there is a vast plethora of intriguing names here which can be adapted to suit babies of any gender.

Come delve in...

  • ADA

    Meaning: Nobility

    Famous namesake: Ada Lovelace (1815 - 1852)

    Ada Lovelace – aka the Enchantress of Numbers - is widely considered to be the world’s first computer programmer, foreseeing the ability to code pretty much anything long before anyone else did. She wrote that algorithm way back in the 1840s.

    Image: Rex Pictures

  • AMELIA

    Meaning: Work

    Famous namesake: Amelia Earhart (1897 - 1937)

    The first woman to ever reach an altitude of 14,000 feet, Amelia Earhart was constantly challenging gender norms. The pilot famously said: “Now and then women should do for themselves what men have already done — occasionally what men have not done — thereby establishing themselves as persons, and perhaps encouraging other women toward greater independence of thought and action.”

    Image: Rex Pictures

  • AUDRE

    Meaning: Noble strength

    Famous namesake: Audre Lorde (1934 - 1992)

    Audre Lorde was an African American writer, feminist, womanist, lesbian, and civil rights activist, who set out to confront issues of racism in feminist thought. In short? She was a total badass.

    Image: Getty

  • BELL

    Meaning: Handsome

    Famous namesake: bell hooks (born 1952)

    bell hooks – also known as Gloria Jean Watkins – penned Feminist Theory: From Margin to Centre, which encouraged women to acknowledge the differences between one another, yet still embrace one another as sisters. That’s right, she gave us the sisterhood.

    Image: Getty

  • BETTY

    Meaning: God is my oath

    Famous namesake: Betty Fridean (1921 - 2006)

    The author of The Feminine Mystique, Betty Friedan was a leading figure in the women’s rights movement. She co-founded the National Organization for Women (NOW) in 1966, which aimed to bring women "into the mainstream of American society now [in] fully equal partnership with men."

    Image: Rex Pictures

  • BILLIE

    Meaning: Resolute protector

    Famous namesake: Billie Jean King (born 1943)

    This phenomenal tennis player set up the first ever all-woman’s tour, before going on to form the Women’s Tennis Association. But she really made her name at Wimbledon’s Battle of the Sexes, where she took on men’s tennis champ (and anti-feminist) Bobby Riggs, winning 6-4 6-3 6-3. 

    Image: Getty

  • CAITLIN

    Meaning: Pure

    Famous namesake: Caitlin Moran (born 1975)

    As in, yes, the iconic author, comedian, and all-round goddess. Her book, How To Be A Woman, helped make feminism more accessible to women everywhere, exploring everything from abortion, to motherhood, to what to call our vaginas.  

    Image: Stylist

  • CAROL

    Meaning: Free man

    Famous namesake: Carol Ann Duffy (born 1955)

    All hail Carol Ann Duffy, the first woman, the first Scot, and the first openly LGBT person to ever be named Britain’s Poet Laureate.

    Image: Getty

  • CHRISTINE

    Meaning: Follower of Christ

    Famous namesake: Christine de Pisan (1364 - 1430)

    She may look like your typical Renaissance poet, but Christine de Pisan’s feminist writings, which analysed the role of women in society and argued for their rights, were lightyears ahead of their time. 

    Image: Rex Pictures

  • CLEO

    Meaning: Fame, glory

    Famous namesake: Cleopatra (69BC - 30BC)

    As in, yes, the immensely powerful Egyptian queen. Forget all that romance stuff with Julius Caeser and Marc Anthony; we’re more interested in the fact that she found time to pen a book – or, more accurately, medical treatise -  while queening over a vast kingdom.

    Image: Rex Pictures

  • COCO

    Meaning: Help

    Famous namesake: Coco Chanel (1883 - 1971)

    Shunning the restrictive clothes that women were forced to wear at the time, Coco Chanel pushed the social boundaries of fashion. She made trousers acceptable for women, helped rid the world of the corset, and revamped men’s designs for women everywhere as she promoted comfort over restraint.

    Image: Rex Pictures

  • DOLLY

    Meaning: Gift of God

    Famous namesake: Dolly Parton (born 1966)

    Don’t believe us? Check out the lyrics she penned for the stage version of Nine To Five: “Under this hair is a brain, not that you'd ever care. And you only see tits, but there's a heart under there…"

    Image: Rex Pictures

  • EDITH

    Meaning: Blessed

    Famous namesake: Edith Archibald (1854 - 1936)

    The Canadian suffragette may be linked to the Temperance movement, but let’s not forget that she battled for decades for women's right to vote. She was the one who led a 1917 delegation of women to convince the Nova Scotia leader George Henry Murray not to block the suffrage bill – and succeeded, too.

    Image: Rex Pictures

  • ELEANOR

    Meaning: Bright shining one

    Famous namesake: Eleanor Smeal (born 1939)

    The president and cofounder of the Feminist Majority Foundation, Eleanor Smeal was the brainchild behind the phrase ‘gender gap’.

    Image: Getty

  • ELIZABETH

    Meaning: By God’s Oath

    Famous namesake: Elizabeth I (1533 - 1603)

    Good Queen Bess is something of a feminist icon, thanks to her intelligence, her strength, and her refusal to be trapped by a political marriage. Plus remember those iconic words? “I know I have the body of a weak, feeble woman; but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too…”

    Image: Rex Pictures

  • EMMELINE

    Meaning: Industrious and hard-working

    Famous namesake: Emmeline Pankhurst (1858 - 1928)

    Emmeline Pankhurst, famed as the leader of the British suffragette movement, shook society into a new patter and helped to win women the vote.

    Image: Rex Pictures

  • EMILY

    Meaning: Rival

    Famous namesake: Emily Davison (1872 - 1913)

    Truly passionate about winning women the vote, Emily Davison often opted for extreme methods, which included chaining herself to the Houses of Parliament, and embarking on over forty hunger strikes. Her most famous moment of protest, however, saw her killed when she stepped in front of King George V's horse Anmer at the Epsom Derby on 4 June 1913.

    Image: Rex Pictures

  • EVA

    Meaning: Living one

    Famous namesake: Eva Peron (1919 - 1952)

    A dedicated champion of women’s rights, the First Lady of Argentina founded the Female Peronist Party – going on to earn women the right to vote in 1947.

    Image: Rex Pictures

  • FLORENCE

    Meaning: Blossoming

    Famous namesake: Florence Nightingale (1820 - 1910)

    The original career woman– and a fierce advocate for women’s rights – Florence Nightingale rejected a marriage proposal from the man that had courted her for nine years, because she was convinced it would interfere with her dreams of being a nurse. She went on to become known as the founder of modern nursing.

    Image: Rex Pictures

  • FRIDA

    Meaning: Beautiful, beloved

    Famous namesake: Frida Kahlo (1907 - 1954)

    “I was born a bitch. I was born a painter…”

    Frida Kahlo has long been held up as a feminist icon, thanks to her artistic exploration of pain, self-image, femininity, and sexuality. 

    Image: Rex Pictures

  • GERMAINE

    Meaning: From Germany

    Famous namesake: Germaine Greer (born 1939)

    This pioneering feminist became a household name when, in her book The Female Eunuch, she declared that the key to women’s liberation was in reclaiming their libido and sexuality.

    Image: Rex Pictures

  • GLORIA

    Meaning: Glorious

    Famous namesake: Gloria Steinem (born 1934)

    Dubbed the ‘mother of feminism’, Gloria Steinem would be a truly admirable namesake for your daughter. If only for the infamous line: “a liberated woman is one who has sex before marriage and a job after.”

    Image: Rex pictures

  • HARRIET

    Meaning: Ruler of the homestead

    Famous namesake: Harriet Tubman (1822 - 1913)

    Born into slavery in the States, Harriet Tubman escaped and used the Underground Railroad to rescue another seventy enslaved families and friends. Throw in the fact that she was the first keynote speaker at the National Federation of Afro-American Women in 1896, and you definitely have a feminist icon.

    Image: Rex Pictures

  • HILLARY

    Meaning: Cheerful

    Famous namesake: Hillary Clinton (born 1947)

    Hillary Clinton is a vocal feminist, highly qualified public servant, and a liberal Democrat. She also has the honour of being America’s first female presidential candidate, which is a pretty big deal.

    Image: Rex Pictures

  • IDA

    Meaning: Work

    Famous namesake: Ida Bell Wells-Barnett (1862 - 1931)

    Ida B. Wells was an African-American journalist and activist who led an anti-lynching crusade in the United States in the 1890s. She later became joined the National Equal Rights League, going on to create the first African-American kindergarten in her community and fight for women's suffrage.

    Image: Rex pictures

  • ISADORA

    Meaning: Gift of Isis

    Famous namesake: Isadora Duncan (1877 - 1927)

    Isadora Duncan was a confident and self-made woman, who challenged the repressive fashions and disciplines enforced upon her gender in the 1800s – and she did it all through the emancipation of modern dance. She even danced whilst pregnant – a move which outraged her peers, particularly as Duncan was unmarried.

    Image: Rex pictures

  • JOAN

    Meaning: God is gracious

    Famous namesake: Joan of Arc (1412 - 1431)

    She wasn’t the innocent French maiden everyone made her out to be; this fiery public speaked led an army, had buckets of character, and refused to suffer fools.

    Image: Rex Pictures

  • JOSEPHINE

    Meaning: May Jehovah add

    Famous namesake: Josephine Butler (1828 - 1906)

    Following the shock death of her youngest daughter, Victorian social reformer Josephine Butler threw herself into helping others, campaigning for women’s suffrage, the right for women to have a better education, the end of child prostitution, and more.

    Image: Rex pictures

  • KATHARINE

    Meaning: Pure

    Famous namesake: Katharine Hepburn (1907 - 2003)

    One of the most radical feminists in Hollywood, Katharine Hepburn demanded roles for strong female characters – and, as a result, became the embodiment of empowerment for women all over the world.

    Image: Rex pictures

  • LOUISA

    Meaning: Famous warrior

    Famous namesake: Louisa May Alcott (1832 - 1888)

    In Little Women, Louisa May Alcott gave the world a far more progressive look at womankind – and gave us Josephine March, the ultimate career girl. The author was also the first woman to vote in the local Concord election of 1879, became a Civil War nurse, and carved out a life as a best-selling literary spinster.

    Image: Rex pictures

  • MARGARET

    Meaning: Precious pearl

    Famous namesake: Margaret Atwood (born 1939)

    The science fiction writer is known for her proto-feminist works, including The Edible Woman, The Handmaid’s Tale, and Surfacing. When asked whether she believes feminism is a set of human rights, she explained: "Yes, because I radically think that women are human beings and therefore they have all the variety that other human beings have. But just because some of them are wonderful, some of them are terrible and most of them are in between, that should not have any bearing on the laws."

    Image: Rex pictures

  • MARY

    Meaning: Wished-for child

    Famous namesake: Mary Wollstonecraft (1759 - 1797)

    An early supporter of women’s rights, Mary Wollstonecraft penned an entire book (A Vindication of the Rights of Women) about why women aren’t intellectually inferior. Her incredibly sound reasoning? That she – and the rest of her gender – had not been offered the same access to education as men. 

    Image: Rex pictures

  • MARIE

    Meaning: Rebellion

    Famous namesake: Marie Stopes (1880 - 1958)

    The pioneer of family planning, Marie Stopes sparked a sexual revolution when she founded the first ever birth control clinic in Britain. 

    Image: Rex pictures

  • MAYA

    Meaning: Goddess

    Famous namesake: Maya Angelou (1928 - 2014)

    Poet, activist, and writer, Maya Angelou was a cultural icon – and was praised for speaking out about rape, abortion, life as a single mother, and her experiences as a prostitute. Her feminist legacy can be summed up by her most famous quote: “I hope that the children have not been so scarred by their upbringing that they only think fear when they see someone else who looks separate from them.”

    Image: Rex pictures

  • MILLICENT

    Meaning: Strong worker

    Famous namesake: Millicent Fawcett (1847 - 1929)

    Millicent was one of the first women to attend a suffrage meeting in the UK – and went on to become president of the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies (the NUWSS), a position she held from 1897 until 1919.

    Image: Rex pictures

  • NAOMI

    Meaning: Pleasantness

    Famous namesake: Naomi Wolf (born 1962)

    The former political advisor has since become a world-renowned writer – and is best known for The Beauty Myth, in which she argues that ‘beauty’ is a patriarchal construct designed to control women. Go figure.

    Image: Rex pictures

  • OCTAVIA

    Meaning: Born eighth

    Famous namesake: Octavia E. Butler (1947 - 2006)

    One of the best-known women authors in the world of science fiction, Octavia E. Butler worked to fill the gap in the market and provide readers with noteworthy female protagonists.

    Image: Getty

  • REBECCA

    Meaning: To tie firmly

    Famous namesake: Rebecca West (1892 - 1983)

    The author and journalist was a stanch feminist, and, when anyone asked her why, she replied: “People call me a feminist whenever I express sentiments that differentiate me from a doormat or a prostitute.”

    Image: Getty

  • ROSE

    Meaning: Fame

    Famous namesake: Rose Schneiderman (1882 - 1972)

    The women’s rights activist coined the phrase ‘bread and roses’ whilst fighting for women’s suffrage, when she said: "What the woman who labours wants is the right to live, not simply exist — the right to life as the rich woman has the right to life, and the sun and music and art.

    "You have nothing that the humblest worker has not a right to have also. The worker must have bread, but she must have roses, too. Help, you women of privilege, give her the ballot to fight with."

    Image: Rex pictures

  • SIMONE

    Meaning: One who hears

    Famous namesake: Simone de Beauvoir (1908 - 1986)

    Her landmark book The Second Sex inspired the Women’s Liberation movement – and she inspired all women to find a job of their own, as it was the “first condition for women’s independence”.

    Image: Getty

  • SOJOURNER

    Meaning: To stay at a place

    Famous namesake: Sojourner Truth (1797 - 1883)

    Born into slavery, Sojourner escaped with her daughter in 1826 and became one of the most powerful equal rights activists ever when she delivered her famous speech, Ain’t I A Woman? She called upon her gender to take what was rightfully theirs, saying: “If women want any rights more than they's got, why don't they just take them, and not be talking about it.”

    Image: Rex pictures

  • SUSAN

    Meaning: Graceful lily

    Famous namesake: Susan B. Anthony (1820 - 1906)

    A founder of the National Women’s Suffrage Association, Susan B. Anthony worked hard to change minds everywhere with her weekly journal, The Revolution, in which she advocated equal rights for both women and African Americans.

    Image: Rex pictures

  • TATYANA

    Meaning: To honour

    Famous namesake: Tatyana Fazlalizadeh (born 1985)

    Tatyana Fazlalizadeh is currently leading the charge against street harassment, thanks to her powerful ‘Stop Telling Women To Smile’ posters. Speaking about her role as an activist, she told the New York Times: “Women need to start talking about their daily moments because it’s the smaller stuff that affects the larger things, like rape, domestic violence, harassment in the workplace.”

    Image: Rex pictures

  • VIRGINIA

    Meaning: Maiden

    Famous namesake: Virginia Woolf (1882 - 1941)

    The famous author examined lesbian and feminist issues in her writing, particularly in her book-length essay, A Room Of One’s Own, in which she underlined the issues faced by female writers.

    "A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction,” she summarised.

    Image: Getty

  • ANDREW

    Meaning: Manly

    Famous namesake: Andy Murray (born 1987)

    Tennis star Andy Murray has loudly and proudly declared himself a feminist, speaking out on behalf of female coaches and sports stars (such as the Williams sisters) time and time again.

    Image: Rex pictures

  • ANTHONY

    Meaning: Graceful lily

    Famous namesake: Susan B. Anthony (1820 - 1906)

    A founder of the National Women’s Suffrage Association, Susan B. Anthony worked hard to change minds everywhere with her weekly journal, The Revolution, in which she advocated equal rights for both women and African Americans.

    Image: Rex pictures

  • ATWOOD

    Meaning: Precious pearl

    Famous namesake: Margaret Atwood (born 1939)

    The science fiction writer is known for her proto-feminist works, including The Edible Woman, The Handmaid’s Tale, and Surfacing. When asked whether she believes feminism is a set of human rights, she explained: "Yes, because I radically think that women are human beings and therefore they have all the variety that other human beings have. But just because some of them are wonderful, some of them are terrible and most of them are in between, that should not have any bearing on the laws."

    Image: Rex pictures

  • AUSTEN

    Meaning: Dignity

    Famous namesake: Jane Austen (1775 - 1817)

    Jane Austen’s novels addressed many issues important to women, making her a noteworthy feminist of her time. She also gave us Elizabeth Bennett, and for that we remain truly thankful.

    Image: Getty

  • BEAU

    Meaning: One who hears

    Famous namesake: Simone de Beauvoir (1908 - 1986)

    Her landmark book The Second Sex inspired the Women’s Liberation movement – and she inspired all women to find a job of their own, as it was the “first condition for women’s independence”.

    Image: Getty

  • BENEDICT

    Meaning: Blessed

    Famous namesake: Benedict Cumberbatch (born 1976)

    Benedict Cumberbatch – aka Sherlock Holmes – has spoken out time and time again on behalf of feminism, famously telling his ‘Cumberbitches’ that he refused to call them so because “it sets feminism back so many notches”. Instead, he said, they are “Cumberpeople”.

    Image: Rex pictures

  • BUTLER

    Meaning: May Jehovah add

    Famous namesake: Josephine Butler (1828 - 1906)

    Following the shock death of her youngest daughter, Victorian social reformer Josephine Butler threw herself into helping others, campaigning for women’s suffrage, the right for women to have a better education, the end of child prostitution, and more.

    Image: Rex pictures

  • BYRON

    Meaning: Place name

    Famous namesake: Byron Hurt (born 1969)

    The filmmaker and activist penned an essay entitled Why I’m a Black Male Feminist, which examined how he – after watching his father do the same – slowly came to feel entitled to mistreat women when it benefitted him to do so. Over time, he recognised his discriminatory behaviour and addressed it, embracing the feminist movement.

    He said: “Not only does feminism give woman a voice, but it also clears the way for men to free themselves from the stranglehold of traditional masculinity. When we hurt the women in our lives, we hurt ourselves, and we hurt our community, too.”

    Image: Getty

  • CHARLES

    Meaning: Free man

    Famous namesake: Charles Fourier (1772 - 1837)

    This radical French philosopher invented the term ‘feminism’ back in the 1800s, when he wrote about how women deserved more status and rights than they had been given. Or, as he put it, “liberty, unless enjoyed by all, is unreal and illusory.”

    Image: Rex pictures

  • CHRISTIAN

    Meaning: Follower of Christ

    Famous namesake: Christian Isobel Johnstone (1781 - 1857)

    An early feminist, this pioneering Scotswoman became the first woman to serve as the paid editor of a major Victorian periodical magazine.

    Image: iStock

  • CLINTON

  • DAVISON

    Meaning: Rival

    Famous namesake: Emily Davison (1872 - 1913)

    Truly passionate about winning women the vote, Emily Davison often opted for extreme methods, which included chaining herself to the Houses of Parliament, and embarking on over forty hunger strikes. Her most famous moment of protest, however, saw her killed when she stepped in front of King George V's horse Anmer at the Epsom Derby on 4 June 1913.

    Image: Rex Pictures

  • FRANCIS

    Meaning: Frenchman

    Famous namesake: Francis Hutcheson (1694 - 1746)

    Francis Hutcheson is thought of as Ireland’s greatest forgotten philosopher, particularly because of his utilitarian views and desire for gender equality. He famously said: “action is best which procures the greatest happiness for the greatest numbers; and that is worst, which, in like manner, occasions misery”.

    Image: iStock

  • FREDERICK

    Meaning: Power

    Famous namesake: Frederick Douglas (1818 - 1895)

    In 1848, Frederick Douglas was the only African-American to attend the Seneca Falls Convention (the first women’s rights convention) in New York – and he argued that he couldn’t accept the right to vote as a black man if women did not share that right. His eloquent words helped pass a resolution asking for women’s suffrage.

    Image: Rex pictures

  • GARRETT

    Meaning: Rules by the spear

    Famous namesake: Elizabeth Garrett Anderson (1836 - 1917)

    This suffragette broke a lot of boundaries; she was the first female surgeon in Britain, the co-founder of a hospital staffed by women, a member of the Central Committee of the National Society for Women's Suffrage in 1889, and the first female mayor and magistrate in Britain. Believe us when we say that’s just the tip of the iceberg.

    Image: Rex pictures

  • JACKSON

    Meaning: God is gracious

    Famous namesake: Jackson Katz (born 1960)

    One of the first men to embark on a Women’s Studies course at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, Katz went on to co-found Mentors in Violence Prevention in a bid to encourage men to discontinue trends of violent masculinity and control. He has also made several critically-acclaimed documentaries about the representations of women and men in the media.

    Image: Getty

  • JEREMY

    Meaning: Exalted of the Lord

    Famous namesake: Jeremy Bentham (1748 - 1832)

    Bentham was a staunch campaigner for women’s rights – he wanted them to have the personal freedom that would allow them to obtain a divorce, he wanted the double standards in sexual matters to be redressed, and he wanted them to be seen as equals in the political arena. 

    Image: Rex pictures

  • JOHN

    Meaning: Jehovah has been gracious

    Famous namesake: John Lennon (1940 - 1980)

    The famous Beatle once said: “We can't have a revolution that doesn't involve and liberate women. It's so subtle the way you're taught male superiority. It took me quite a long time to realise that my maleness was cutting off certain areas for Yoko [Ono]. She's a red hot liberationist and was quick to show me where I was going wrong, even though it seemed to me that I was just acting naturally. That's why I'm always interested to know how people who claim to be radical treat women.”

    Image: Rex pictures

  • JOSS

    Meaning: One of the Goths

    Famous namesake: Joss Whedon (born 1964)

    The creator of feminist icon Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Joss Whedon has spoken passionately about his desire for gender equality – and consistently called for Hollywood to create more roles for strong women. No wonder he’s such a feminist icon.

    Image: Rex pictures

  • JUSTIN

    Meaning: Just

    Famous namesake: Justin Trudeau (1971)

    The Canadian Prime Minister has vowed that he is “going to keep saying loud and clear that I am a feminist until it is met with a shrug.”

    Image: Rex pictures

  • MARK

    Meaning: God of war

    Famous namesake: Mark Ruffalo (born 1967)

    Actor Mark Ruffalo is a pro-choice campaigner and an avid feminist. To all those who don’t believe in gender equality, he has this to say: "You're insulting every woman who was forcibly restrained in a jail cell with a feeding tube down her throat for your right to vote, less than 100 years ago. You're undermining every woman who fought to make marital rape a crime (it was legal until 1993). In short, kiss my ass you ignorant little jerks."

    Image: Rex pictures

  • MURRAY

    Meaning: Manly

    Famous namesake: Andy Murray (born 1987)

    Tennis star Andy Murray has loudly and proudly declared himself a feminist, speaking out on behalf of female coaches and sports stars (such as the Williams sisters) time and time again.

    Image: Rex pictures

  • PATRICK

    Meaning: Noble

    Famous namesake: Patrick Stewart (born 1940)

    Actor Patrick Stewart was raised in a home with an abusive father, which has encouraged him to speak up about gender equality, and work with organisations like Ring the Bell to end violence against women.

    Image: Rex pictures

  • RYAN

    Meaning: Little king

    Famous namesake: Ryan Gosling (born 1980)

    Thanks to those ‘Hey Girl’ memes, Ryan Gosling has become synonymous with feminism – and, in the real world, he’s spoken out against the media’s reaction to ‘controversial’ oral sex scenes in cinema, too.

    He said: “The MPAA is okay supporting scenes that portray women in scenarios of sexual torture and violence for entertainment purposes, but they are trying to force us to look away from a scene that shows a woman in a sexual scenario, which is both complicit and complex.

    "It's misogynistic in nature to try and control a woman's sexual presentation of self. I consider this an issue that is bigger than this film.”

    Image: Rex pictures

  • STUART

    Meaning: House guard

    Famous namesake: Stuart John Mills (1806 - 1873)

    One of the earliest male feminists, Mill’s famous essay Subjection of Women - written in 1869 - campaigned strongly for women’s rights, suffrage and equal access to education for women. 

    Image: iStock

  • WILLIAM

    Meaning: Resolute protector

    Famous namesake: William Masters (1915 - 2001)

    If you’ve seen Masters of Sex, you’ll know that William Masters began researching female sexuality in 1956 – and wound up proving that women don’t need a man to help them climax, and that everyone, regardless of gender, deserves to enjoy themselves in the bedroom. 

    Image: Getty

Topics

Share this article

Author

Kayleigh Dray

Kayleigh Dray is editor of Stylist.co.uk, where she chases after rogue apostrophes and specialises in films, comic books, feminism and television. On a weekend, you can usually find her drinking copious amounts of tea and playing boardgames with her friends. 

Related Posts