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New research proves why women urgently need to ask for a salary review

Posted by
Hollie Richardson
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Ask for a pay rise today

Nearly three quarters of women haven’t had a pay review over the last 12 months because they find it awkward talking about money with their bosses, according to new research. 

Asking for a pay rise can be tricky, especially as it involves having to vocalise your achievements – and we all know how squeamish that can be. But, if we’re to properly address the gender pay gap and ensure fair payment, it’s something we have to keep on doing.

We’ve taken a look at how to ask for a pay rise plenty of times before, along with advice on how to confidently talk about achievements during a review. But new research shows that women still aren’t ensuring they get the salary they deserve.

Still feel a bit nauseous thinking about it? Well here’s why it’s so important.

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The study, by CV-Library, has revealed that nearly two-thirds (61.7%) of women find it awkward talking to their boss about pay, compared to 48.5% of men. This has resulted in 75.7% of female workers not receiving a pay review in the last 12 months.

In addition to this, the study, which surveyed over 1,200 UK professionals, found that a further three quarters (75.6%) of women believe they’re underpaid, compared to 74.6% of men. Worse still, nearly half (49%) of women think that their employer actively avoids the topic of pay altogether.

It also reveals that only 15.3% of women have received a pay rise in the past year, despite not receiving a formal salary review from their employer.

gender pay gap
Women are still finding it awkward to talk about money at work. 

“The gender pay gap remains a real issue in UK workplaces and while many companies are taking a proactive approach to resolving it, it’s clear that more needs to be done to ensure fair pay for all genders. After all, feeling like you’re underpaid and aren’t properly financially rewarded for your efforts at work can be demoralising,” says CV-Library CEO and founder Lee Biggins.

“In order to keep on track with inflation, all workers are entitled to a pay rise if they have met their targets and are performing well in the role. If you believe your efforts aren’t being recognised and you deserve an increase in your wage, it’s time to broach the subject with your employer.”

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So, to give some fresh inspiration, here are five quick tips for asking for a pay rise:

1. Schedule in a meeting with your boss with the agenda set as a pay review

2. Come prepared with examples and arguments of why you deserve it; organisation is key

3. Be confident in your arguments but don’t appear arrogant; this can deter your employer

4. Don’t be afraid to negotiate, it can’t hurt to try your luck meeting them half way

5. Be prepared to be told ‘no’, you won’t always get a pay rise the first time you ask, but there are other aspects you can negotiate on, like holiday or workplace perks.

Images: Getty

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Hollie Richardson

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