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Using these two phrases at work could help boost your career

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Jasmine Andersson
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According to a careers expert, it can take just two words to change your career.

Professor Bernard Roth of Stanford University, aka the writer of The Achievement Habit: Stop Wishing, Start Doing, and Take Command of Your Life,  believes that making two small alterations to the way we speak at work can help us to achieve more in the workplace. 

A firm advocate of “design thinking”, Roth believes the key to approaching our work positively is determined by the word choices we use. 

Design thinking is a solution-focused and action-orientated school of thought that looks at positive thinking to create a preferred future. Drawing upon logic, imagination, intuition, and systemic reasoning, it seeks to remove the negative connotations of problem-solving that can frustrate us throughout our career.

So, what’s the golden recipe?

First of all, instead of using the words “have to”, we should use “want to”, he tells Indy 100.

By doing this, we take ownership for our actions, and ensure that we understand our role in the choices we make.

In using “have to”, we exaggerate the obligatory element of our work tasks, and have a less open attitude towards doing them.

And when you’re faced with a problem, don’t say “but”, say “and”.

The word “but” indicates that the problem creates an either/or choice, when both elements of the issue need to be considered on equal footing to create a solution.

If you’re still trying to find the job of your dreams, or even if you’re looking for a career overhaul, our handy list of all of the best places to find a job is just one click away.

Images: iStock

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Jasmine Andersson

When she isn't talking about her emotional attachment to meal deals or serenading unfortunate individuals with David Bowie power solos in karaoke booths, Jasmine writes about gender, politics and culture as a freelance journalist. She wastes her days tweeting @the__chez  

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