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Coronavirus: there are 3 different types of people in lockdown. Which one are you?

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Lauren Geall
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New analysis from Kings College London has revealed that there’s three different types of lockdown response: accepting, suffering or resisting.

We’re all responding to the coronavirus lockdown in our own, unique ways. While some people are baking bread or taking part in viral tag challenges, others are using this time to take all the online courses they possibly can or simply fix their sleep schedule.

It may seem, then, that there’s no one stereotypical response to the lockdown. We’re all doing what we can to get ourselves through this strange and uncertain period and manage the rollercoaster of moods and emotions we’re experiencing.

But despite all this, new analysis from King’s College London has revealed that our individual responses to the lockdown can be sorted into three distinct groups: the accepting, the suffering and the resisting.

The analysis, based on an Ipsos MORI survey conducted in early April, reveals that the UK is made up of “three broad but distinct groups of people” who are responding to the lockdown and coronavirus pandemic in different ways. 

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The most interesting bit? Your group could explain a lot about how you’ve been feeling over the last couple of weeks, from how you’ve been sleeping to the amount of time you’ve spent on social media.

So which “lockdown group” are you a part of? 

“The Accepting”

A woman meditating
People in the accepting group are more likely to feel calm about and follow the lockdown guidelines.

According to the analysis, 48% of the UK population belong to “The Accepting” group – those who have responded well to the lockdown measures and haven’t found this period too taxing on their mental health. 

In this group, very few are experiencing adverse effects as a result of the lockdown – 12% are losing sleep, only 8% are feeling more anxious and depressed as a result of the lockdown and 6% say they’re finding the lockdown measures extremely difficult to cope with.

People in this group are also least likely to check social media for coronavirus updates on a daily basis, and a massive 91% support lockdown measures. 

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However, there may be a reason why these people are finding lockdown a bit easier than others. Only 28% of people in these groups say they’re certain, very or fairly likely to face financial difficulties as a result of the lockdown – the lowest percentage of the groups.

As a result of their accepting response, 87% of the people in this group say they’re following lockdown rules completely or nearly all the time.

“The Suffering”

A woman on her laptop
People in the suffering group are more likely to check social media and think about coronavirus a lot.

44% of people across the country are part of “The Suffering” group – those people who are finding the lockdown particularly difficult for their mental health. 

A massive 93% of the people in this group have felt more anxious and depressed since lockdown began, and 64% of these people have also slept less or worse than usual. A revealing 24% say they think about coronavirus all the time.

The way they’re feeling has also shaped their ongoing response to the crisis – 64% of the people who are suffering with lockdown say they check social media for updates on coronavirus daily or more frequently. 

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These people are also more likely to comply with government guidelines too – 93% say they’re following lockdown rules completely or nearly all the time.

Interestingly, women make up the majority of the people in this group by 64% to 36%.  

“The Resisting” 

A woman looking out the window
People in the resisting group are more likely to think too much fuss is being made over coronavirus.

Only 9% of the UK population make up “The Resisting” group, which describes those people resisting the change in lifestyle demanded of them by the government.

Less than half of the people in this group say they’re following lockdown rules completely or nearly all the time, and 58% think “too much fuss is being made about the risk of coronavirus.”

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This group is generally more likely to believe claims that are false of currently judged to be unlikely, such as the idea that coronavirus was made in a lab.

But there may be a reason behind their resistance to the measures – 65% of this group expect significant personal financial impact from the crisis. 

If there’s one thing these responses can tell us about how we’re feeling during the coronavirus lockdown, it’s that there’s no one “right” way to feel at the moment. Despite all the pressure to be productive and use our time in lockdown to achieve our goals, it’s clear that only one thing really matters at the moment: getting through this.  

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Lauren Geall

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