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Do you get grumpy when you’re bloated? You could be a victim of ‘groating’, say scientists

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Megan Murray
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Suffer with bloating and noticed it brings down your mood too? You’ve got groating. Here we explore the causes of bloating in women and ways to stop it, to get your mood back on the mend. 

Ah, bloating. It sounds like a small thing, but the ball of air that can inflate our tummies – be it on our periods or after a heavy meal – can be painful and uncomfortable.

It’s no wonder, then, that bloating makes so many of us feel grumpy. However, scientists have now done a little digging into the causes of ‘groating’ (aka the feeling of being grumpy because of bloating), and they’ve discovered there’s a very specific reason our happiness levels take a downturn when we’re bloated.

And it’s all down to the strong link between our gut and our brains.

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Speaking to nutrition expert Tom Jenane, the Metro reports that the reason our digestive system and emotions feel so linked is because there’s an actual connection between our intestinal functions and the emotion centres in our brains, known as the gut brain axis. 

“Comprising several neurohumoral components, there are an increasing amount of studies showing the communication between the brain and the gut and how bloating could be causing a negative emotional effect,” says Jenane.

In other words, you’ve not been imagining or over-exaggerating the negative effect bloating can have, and next time your friend exasperatedly rubs a hand over her tum, you can tell her she’s groated. 

Most common causes of women bloating
What are the most common causes of women bloating?

What are the main causes of bloating in women?

There are lots of reasons why women may be feeling bloated. Some of the reasons are more common and everyday causes include menstruating or hormonal fluxes throughout the month, food intolerances, eating foods that can cause bloating like cabbage, cauliflower or broccoli or drinking fizzy drinks.

Consistent bloating may also be due to illnesses like irritable bowel syndrome, Crohn’s disease or other functional gastrointestinal disorders. Bloating for an extended period of time can also be a sign of ovarian cancer, so it’s really important to go and see your GP if it’s something you’re struggling with. 

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How to reduce bloating

The NHS recommends that the first steps you should take to reduce bloating are simple tricks like sitting down to eat and not eating with your mouth full or chewing gum. This should limit the amount of air you are swallowing. You could also try eating slower and cut down portion sizes to stop your stomach getting overly full.

It is recommended that people who suffer with bloating with a link to constipation each a rich-fibre diet, drink lots of fluid and try to do regular exercise. 

If you do think you may have one of the more serious conditions listed about though, it’s important to check with a medical professional to get the correct treatment. 

Images: Getty / iStock

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Megan Murray

Megan Murray is a digital journalist for stylist.co.uk, who enjoys writing about London happenings, beautiful places, delicious morsels and generally spreading sparkle wherever she can.

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