Life

Samantha Bee’s comments on not wanting to be the “only woman in late night TV” are chilling

Posted by
Hollie Richardson
Published
Samantha Bee television

The Full Frontal with Samantha Bee host explains why she finds the label “unsettling” after the cancellations of other female-led late night shows. 

Late Night, starring Emma Thompson and Mindy Kaling, perfectly examined the treatment of women in late night television entertainment. (It’s also really funny and you should definitely go watch it). The film highlights very real issues, ranging from ageism to the lack of female writers, which continue to be prevalent in the industry.

For further proof of this, comedian and TV presenter Samantha Bee has spoken out about how “unsettling” it feels to be the only female late night host in America. In an interview with Variety magazine, she said: “It’s a bit unsettling. It’s been a bad year to be a woman in this space. It’s not really a badge that I want to wear.”

You may also like

“Don’t get into comedy to be famous”: Ellen DeGeneres shares her advice for aspiring female stand-ups

Comedian Bee  - who was named one of Time’s most influential people in the world in the Time 100 list in 2017 - spent 12 years on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart before starting her own show, Full Frontal with Samantha Bee. Her political humour and sharp criticisms of Donald Trump saw her viewing figures soar in 2017 and it has been commissioned to run until at least 2020. The show is currently running an “Emmy For Your Consideration” segment which explores the challenges Bee faces as the only woman leading in late night talk entertainment

Want a weekly edit of key pieces and brilliant brands? Sign up for the Stylist Loves Fashion email

Bee referred to the recent cancellations of other female led night shows, including Busy’s Tonight hosted by Busy Philipps, I Love You America presented by Sarah Silverman, Michelle Wolf’s The Break on Netflix and The Rundown with Robin Thede.

She went on to explain how she thinks female presenters aren’t given enough time to give their shows a chance. “I do think the networks probably didn’t give them enough chance to find their sea legs,” she continued. 

“They were good shows, they were moving forward, they were growing. It takes a while to grow an audience. It truly does… they just needed more time. In the late night space, it takes a while to properly grow your audience. There are a lot of options out there and you just need to be patient with it. And let it grow and let it find its people. When you cut it off prematurely, it’s really unfortunate.”

You may also like

Busy Philipps superbly sums up why it isn’t brave to share our abortion stories

This also raises questions about late night talk shows in the UK, which are currently led by men including Graham Norton and Jonathan Ross. As the Late Night film and Full Frontal with Samantha Bee prove, more female presenters in this entertainment slot can only ever be a good - and very funny - thing for everybody. 

Image: Getty

Topics

Share this article

Author

Hollie Richardson

Recommended by Hollie Richardson

Life

Mindy Kaling knew exactly what to say when someone asked about the father of her baby

The Late Night star just shut down questions about her baby, because it really is nobody’s business.

Posted by
Hollie Richardson
Published
People

Emma Thompson calls on Boris Johnson to help London woman jailed in Iran

The actress slammed the foreign secretary at a rally for imprisoned British-Iranian citizen Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe.

Posted by
Moya Crockett
Published
People

Sarah Silverman hits back after being shamed for re-wearing same dress

Sarah Silverman took to Twitter to have her say after she was shamed for re-wearing her favourite dress

Posted by
Kayleigh Dray
Published