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The Grenfell fire tribute wall attracts thousands of messages hoping to give strength to victims

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Elle Griffiths
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A makeshift tribute wall has emerged near the scene of the Grenfell tower block fire. 

Both local residents and people from all over the wider community have left moving messages for the dead and the missing. 

17 people are known to have died, with that number expected to rise, after a fire engulfed the 24-story block in West London on Wednesday. 

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Powerful messages include: "Bonds formed in fire are difficult to break"

The horrific accident, widely believed to have been preventable, has shocked the country and caused mass outpourings of grief.

Celebrities including Rita Ora, Adele and Lily Allen have all paid personal visits to the site of the tragedy. 

Adele was seen embracing grief-stricken relatives as they stood around in shock. 

The tributes and messages have come from neighbouring parts of London, other parts of the UK and even as far away as Mauritius. 

They are also in several languages, showing both the diversity of the area affected and the scope of its impact around the country and the world. 

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Messages came from as far as Mauritius and were in several languages

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One person simply asked "why?" while others left personal messages for those missing, presumed dead



The Prime Minister incurred the wrath of locals when she visited the site on Wednesday but failed to meet any victims or relatives.

Religious messages can also be seen, including several from Muslims.

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Messages of anger and sorrow are mixed in with each other in the wake of the horrific tragedy

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People hand-wrote messages of solidarity and grief

They were said to have ran through the building banging on doors to wake people and alert them to the danger. 



Perhaps most heartbreaking are the messages addressed to people personally as many of the missing are yet to be identified or confirmed dead. 

Among them are pictures of the missing, from relatives appealing for help and clinging on to hope. 

Images: Rex Features/Getty

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Elle Griffiths

Elle Griffiths is a freelance writer living in Brighton. She divides her time pretty evenly between despairing about American Politics, watching Mad Men re-runs and complaining about Southern Rail delays.

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