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How do your favourite authors and characters take their coffee? Literary Starbucks tumblr can tell you

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There are times when the internet produces something so clever you don't know why no one thought of it before. 

Literary Starbucks is such a website with a relatively simple concept: how would people in literature - authors and characters - make their order at the coffee chain?

The site imagines what authors such as Roald Dahl, Agatha Christie, Charlotte and Emily Bronte and also Jane Austen, would decide to order from a barista and how they would go about it. 

For example, one of our favourites is Jane Austen's order: “Austen goes up to the counter and orders a cinnamon spice latte. The barista is a bore. The man behind her in line orders exactly what she orders; he too is a bore. He is handsome in the conventional sense, but there is no chance they could ever be married.”

If that isn't classic Austen, we don't know what is.

And it's not just writers, there are also some of our favourite literary characters in there too, such as Little Red Riding Hood and Sleeping Beauty. 

Created by three students who study at Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota in the USA, Jill, Wilson, and Nora came up with the idea and have now amassed over 25,000 followers. 

Take a look at more of our favourite authors and literary characters orders by clicking on the gallery below.

iterarystarbucks.tumblr.com

  • Margaret Atwood

    “Margaret Atwood goes up to the counter, but the Starbucks is no longer serving coffee. In fact, coffee has ceased to be manufactured. Atwood recalls the taste of coffee— sweet and bitter, a little melancholy— but she can’t quite recreate it perfectly. It’s gone, like the world she once knew, a whisper on the winds across the unknowable ocean. She leaves the Starbucks. The streets are empty. Her footsteps echo as she crosses the pavement, heads out of the city into fields, which brush against her body as she moves through them. She can nearly see the ocean. She gets into a van that will take her to somewhere.”

  • J.K.Rowling

    “J.K. Rowling goes up to the counter and orders seven pumpkin spice lattes. The barista gives her eight.”

  • Mary Shelley

    “Mary Shelley goes up to the counter with her eccentric friend, who is wearing a lab coat. He wants to make his own drink out of the elements of other drinks - an espresso with hot chocolate, iced tea, whipped cream, caramel, pumpkin spice, mocha, and peppermint. “That’s too many seasons at once!” the barista cries. There is a flash of lightning. The espresso machine begins to move. The back room of the Starbucks is full of pitchforks.”

  • Romeo

    “Romeo goes up to the counter and orders a white chocolate mocha. As he’s waiting for it, the barista sets down a hazelnut macchiato for someone else. Romeo is struck by the realization that this is the perfect drink for him, and takes it, forgetting that he and everyone in his family is allergic to nuts.”

  • Jane Austen

    “Austen goes up to the counter and orders a cinnamon spice latte. The barista is a bore. The man behind her in line orders exactly what she orders; he too is a bore. He is handsome in the conventional sense, but there is no chance they could ever be married.”

  • C.S.Lewis

    “C.S. Lewis tries to go up to the counter, but as soon as he opens the inner door of the Starbucks, he is no longer inside a coffee shop - he has been transported to a snowy wonderland. It doesn’t matter. This world has Turkish delight in it, and that’s what he really wanted, anyway.”

  • Sherlock Holmes

    “Sherlock Holmes goes up to the counter, accompanied by an aged doctor. Holmes orders two grande Earl Grey teas with room for cream and sugar. He makes eye contact with the barista and says, “Yes, my dear, I know it was you.” The barista flees the scene, with Holmes in hot pursuit. Dogs howl in the distance. Holmes continues drinking his tea.”

  • Little Red Riding Hood

    “Little Red Riding Hood goes up to the counter and orders all of the pastries in the store, allegedly for her grandmother. She absentmindedly leaves them on a table because she sees someone waving to her from the alley outside of the shop and she thinks it would be a terrific idea to go say hi to him.”

  • Sleeping Beauty

    “Sleeping Beauty goes up to the counter. “Which drink has the most caffeine?” she demands. The barista hands her a cafe americano. She drinks the whole thing in one gulp.”

  • Agatha Christie

    “Agatha Christie goes up to the counter and orders a cafe mocha. She stirs it dramatically, turns to the other occupants of the Starbucks, and announces that she knows who has committed the murder. The barista attempts to escape without notice, but the policeman in disguise subdues her quickly. Christie looks down, but her coffee is missing. It reappears a week later, but no one has ever determined where it went for those seven days.”

  • Roald Dahl

    “Roald Dahl goes up to the counter and orders a grande hot chocolate and a tall peach green tea. He offers the foxy barista a piece of gum. She takes it and promptly turns into a blueberry. He leaves the shop and walks down the street with his extraordinarily tall companion.”

  • Lady Macbeth

    “Lady Macbeth goes up to the counter and sees three female baristas intently hovering over the espresso machine, chanting something unintelligible. She decides to order a Passion tea and proceeds to spill it all over her clothes and hands. She runs screaming to the bathroom. The three baristas cackle in uncanny unison.”

  • Emily Bronte

    “Emily Brontë goes up to the counter and orders a cafe latte. The barista misunderstands her and gives her a decaf capuccino. Emily storms out in a fury, and spends the next decade walking past Starbucks carrying cups of Caribou Coffee. She and Starbucks never reconcile.”

  • Charlotte Bronte

    “Charlotte Brontë goes up to the counter for a cup of tea and Reader, she orders it!”

  • Shakespeare

    “Shakespeare goes up to the counter and orders a large cappucino with cinnamon. “Sir, we don’t have larges here. We have ventis,” says the barista. Shakespeare stares at him. “What’s in a name?” he asks.”

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