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How to follow up on a job interview, by a career expert who knows

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Hollie Richardson
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How to follow up on a job interview

A careers expert shares advice on what to do after a job interview. Because we all know how excruciating that part of the hiring process can be. 

The time period in between a job interview and finding out whether or not you’ve got the role can only be described as a painful purgatory. In a world where pretty much everything is instantaneous thanks to social media, email and apps, we expect to know the employer’s decision as soon as we’ve exited the revolving doors. Patience is a virtue that we really should practice when it comes to the job interview process. But that’s not to say that we can’t do things in that in between to improve our chances.

With an overwhelming amount of career tips and pieces of advice available, it’s hard to know what the best thing to do is. So, with that in mind, we thought we’d ask an expert to give it to us straight.

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How to follow up on a job interview

CEO of CV-Library, Lee Biggins, shares his three top tips with Stylist.

Interview
How to follow up after an interview: because the interview itself wasn't painful enough.

Should I sent a thank you email after an interview?

This one has been confusing us ever since the dawn of the digital world. And the answer is yes, you definitely should send a follow-up email after the interview. “Send this to the hiring manager no more than a day after your interview,” says Biggins. “Specify the role you interviewed for, the date it took place on and reaffirm your interest. Finish by saying that you’re looking forward to hearing back.”

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Is it OK to connect with a potential employer on social media?

Of course, you probably shouldn’t be slipping into the interviewer’s DMs or sending them a friend request on Facebook. However, LinkedIn is the perfect platform for “connecting” with employers. “Connect with the hiring manager on LinkedIn while you’re waiting to hear back,” advises Biggins. “There’s no harm in sending a connect request to the hiring manager. It will keep you on their radar, especially if there’s a number of other qualified applicants being considered for the job.”

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Should I send a follow-up email if I don’t hear anything?

Admittedly, this is perhaps the most excruciating suggestion, especially if you suffer from social anxiety. You’re worried that they’ve forgotten all about you, but the idea of looking “too eager” makes you cringe. If the hiring manager gave a specific day that you’d be told the decision, don’t enquire about it until after that date. “If you weren’t told when you would get feedback, send this email five business days after the interview,” adds Biggins. “Be clear and direct in asking for an update and finish by thanking the hiring manager.” 

And that’s all there is to it. Hopefully, after following these tips, you’ll get the good news you want to hear. If not, take what you can learn from the experience, recharge and get that standout CV ready for the next ideal role advertisement that comes along.

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