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Yes, really: middle class graffiti is a thing now

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A new trend has seen scrawlings of health food words such as quinoa appear on Bristol walls as part of a new tongue-in-cheek trend dubbed “middle class graffiti”. 

Although spray painting walls has traditionally been the domain of rebellious statement (youths and their tags), it's now, apparently, taken on a wholesome and genteel edge in the West Country.

The concept has captured the attention of the social media masses, as fans share snaps of the ironic street art under the hashtag #middleclassgraffitti.

Broadchurch actor Joe Sims tweeted a photo of the above quinoa graffiti tag he found in Bristol with the caption: “Bristol, a lot posher than it used to be #middleclassgraffitti.” 

“I'm not sure if he will be the next Banksy. He might have another super food to battle with - possibly avocado? Maybe it will take over postcode rivalry,” he added. 

He told the Bristol Post: “It is perfectly Bristolian and in keeping with the urban gentrification of the area.” 

Quinoa

Dan Newso uploaded this gem

Bristol is famous for its diverse and talented street art scene with the city's “Banksy effect” allowing youngsters to openly spray the streets at numerous public events to help blossoming artists to thrive. 

The Banksy exhibition in Bristol two years ago attracted hundreds of thousands of visitors and art fans flock to the city to see his original murals.

Among the highlights of the new middle class graffiti trend are spray versions of bulgar wheat, muesli, kale, pesto, yogurt and crab salad. Adding to the chorus are some social responsibility messages (“pick up your poo”) and pop culture appreciation (“I love Frozen”) .

Come take a look at a few of our favourite examples from the burgeoning new concept, below.

Quinoa

#MiddleClassGraffiti #EarlGrey

A photo posted by @jcobb84 on

You when someone just like, gets you. Like, on a spiritual level #foundmysoulmate #chubs4lyfe #hackney

A photo posted by Sarah Quine (@missquine) on

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